Spider cracks in new paint/primer over ceiling texture


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Old 03-28-14, 01:03 PM
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Spider cracks in new paint/primer over ceiling texture

Long time visitor, first time poster here. Hoping someone may be able to help me to get the bottom of this.

I recently purchased a foreclosed home with ugly popcorn ceilings. Immediately after closing, we scraped the popcorn texture down. Once the popcorn had been removed, we applied a knockdown texture (sheet rock wall and ceiling texture). We let the new texture dry for several drys before priming (kilz water based primer/sealer) and painting (behr premium plus interior ceiling flat). We used a roller with a 1 1/4 nap for most of the ceilings.

A day after priming and painting several bedrooms, we noticed tiny "spider" cracks forming in certain spots around the rooms. If the cracks were picked at, we found that the paint pulled off the primer and texture as well. We hypothesized this was due to the high level of dust in the house and spent a day removing as much dust as possible and cleaning the ceilings.

The next day we primed a previously untouched spot of ceiling to test our dust theory. After letting the primer dry, we noticed just as many cracks as before. Additionally, there are several spots that look like the paint is chipping off the ceiling. This essentially throws our dust theory out the window and leaves us wondering if our tools are incompatible.

Much of the house only has the knockdown texture on the ceiling and has not been painted or primed. The texture on its own does not appear to have any cracks or imperfections. At this point we are also wondering if the job is worth saving or if we need to scrape the knockdown texture and start from square one. Additionally, if the job can be saved, what steps should we take to repair cracked/peeling spots?

Thanks for your time!
 
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Old 03-28-14, 01:33 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Would the cracking show up in pics? - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

A little hard to say sight unseen but sometimes paint will crack if the underlying j/c hasn't completely dried or the primer/paint is applied too heavy. The different layers will dry at different rates causing the cracks.

I never use water based Kilz, it's a poor stain sealing primer and has been reported to have adhesion issues. I don't know that using a different primer would be the answer.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 02:38 PM
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I have included two pictures. The first picture is of the small cracks as they start to appear in the paint. The second picture is of what it looks like when a chip falls off.

You are suggesting that we have applied too much primer. That may be so. We applied the primer as if it were the "paint" meaning we covered every square inch with enough that you had a hard time seeing the color of the knockdown and drywall under it.

Are there any primers that you would recommend for painting over a knockdown finish?
 
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Old 03-28-14, 02:55 PM
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You'll have to scrape off anything that is loose
Did it get cold in the house before the paint dried good? paint that has froze on the wall will look like that ..... but it could still be from the primer or paint being applied too heavy. The exposed paint will air dry quickly while the paint underneath is still wet.

Most any latex primer works well on ceilings. While you want to cover all the ceiling with primer it's ok if you can see thru it. Most primers are formulated more to seal than to give complete coverage. No heavier than that texture is, I'd use a 3/4" nap roller.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 03:01 PM
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I live in Florida so the temperature has ranged from 50-80 degrees, and there hasn't been much humidity.

I will try a roller with a shorter nap. Thanks for your help.

Any other opinions?
 
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Old 03-28-14, 03:10 PM
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I missed where you lived in fla although I used to paint in central fla and have had paint freeze on the wall there

After you scrape off the loose you'll need to inspect the ceiling to see if you need to touch it up with joint compound before priming.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 03:46 PM
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What would I need to touch up with jc?

What we did was scrape and sand the parts that were cracked and peeling off then add a new layer of texture over them. The plan is to wait several days for the texture to dry before testing it with a coat of primer. Will probably look to use less primer this time.
 
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Old 03-29-14, 05:11 AM
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Re texturing might be enough, often when you scrape off paint there is a ridge around the perimeter. Usually you need to apply joint compound to that area to fill it back in. Normally 12-24 hrs is plenty enough time for texture to dry [it will be completely white when dry] but I can see the wisdom in giving it extra time.
 
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Old 03-30-14, 07:46 AM
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Thanks for the advice. I went to sherwin Williams and picked up their pro-block oil based primer and a 3/4 nap roller. The walls that I have done with it have not shown signs of cracking. Hoping that this primer is able to keep moisture from moving from the primer and paint to the knockdown.
 
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Old 03-30-14, 09:42 AM
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I think the oil base pro block might be overkill but it should do well for you.
 
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Old 03-30-14, 04:23 PM
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What do you mean by overkill?
 
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Old 03-31-14, 04:26 AM
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I'm not convinced you need an oil base primer. I would think a latex primer would do fine BUT it doesn't hurt anything [other than fumes/clean up] to use an oil base primer. Oil base primers do a better job of sealing than latex primers.
 
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Old 03-31-14, 09:06 AM
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VENTILATE VENTILATE VENTILATE. If you're going to be rolling out anywhere near a gallon or more oil primer, be sure to open windows and use a fan if possible.

Having been poisoned by fumes from oil primer myself in the past, I can tell you it's a terrifying experience to be standing there wondering if your mind is going to get back to normal at some point.
 
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Old 03-31-14, 12:29 PM
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You'll recover from the fumes but that doesn't mean they are harmless. While I applied them for years with no issues, I now have problems when using solvent based coatings without a respirator.
The medical term is 'occupational over exposure to solvents'
 
 

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