Painting bathroom help!


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Old 07-14-14, 03:25 PM
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Painting bathroom help!

I'm new to this forum and new to trying to DIY, so excuse the ignorance. My wife is wanting to paint our 1/2 bathroom and found the color she wanted on one of the Behr "color cards" at Home Depot. We only got one of those small sample containers so that we could paint a small area to see what it looks like. The color she picked is a really light green color. Again, I'm a typical guy so I have no clue what the official name of the color is. The current color of the wall in the bathroom is a light beige type color. When she painted on some of the green it looked blue'ish as if maybe the two colors are bleeding together. Do we need to paint the wall first with a primer or do we have to sand down the entire bathroom??? I'm not sure the best/easiest way to do this as it seems like maybe that's why the color looks so different when we paint it on the walls.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 03:33 PM
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Generally when changing colors it takes 2 coats to completely cover the old color. Mixing beige and green would not make blue. If it appears blue its because of the pigments in the green. Or perhaps the can you used wasn't mixed completely, or wasn't mixed correctly to match the sample. Colors also look different when they are wet vs when they are dry. Walls will also pick up some colors from the room itself, lighting can also be a factor in how colors appear to the eye.

In the end, you will probably want to just give the typical husband response. "Whatever you think, honey."

You should lightly sand the walls prior to painting, then dust them off. And *very* lightly sand between coats if there seems to be any lint from your roller in the first coat of paint. Cheap-o rollers will tend to leave lots of lint. Washing and combing a new roller prior to use is often a good idea.
 
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Old 07-15-14, 03:33 AM
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The sample containers are often a cheap grade of paint and don't cover well another coat of the sample should show the correct color. I don't use Behr coatings so I can't say how well they cover/preform. I agree with everything X said!

Not knowing how old your house is, if there is a chance your bath rm is painted with oil base enamel - you'll want to preform this test http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html. Latex paints don't adhere well to oil base enamel and a solvent based primer must be used before switching to latex.
 
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Old 07-19-14, 08:06 AM
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Test paint color on a piece of white cardboard

If you are not sure if the color seems off due to the sample paint itself or some interaction with your wall then just take a piece of white cardboard and paint that with the same plaint.

I've done that before on poster board sized pieces to make "large paint chips" for my wife so we could hang them on the wall or place them around the room rather than putting the sample paint on the wall.

I'll also add that we just re-painted our bathroom. We tend to buy our paint at a local paint store but my wife liked a color from the Behr paint at Home Depot but they were able to match it just fine from the color chip. We did ask them about a paint that would hold up to the humidity of the bathroom and not mildew and they recommended a specific paint for that - it was an acrylic latex. In our case we removed wallpaper and had a lot of damage to the walls that we had to repair so I had used a primer on them before painting.
 
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Old 07-19-14, 12:35 PM
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We did ask them about a paint that would hold up to the humidity of the bathroom and not mildew and they recommended a specific paint for that
That would have been a kitchen and bath [or just bath] paint. It has extra mildewcide and is formulated for the harsher environment that bath rm walls/ceiling are exposed to.
 
 

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