Bad Paint job on Kitchen cabinets / Remove it / paint over


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Old 07-24-14, 07:09 PM
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Bad Paint job on Kitchen cabinets / Remove it / paint over

Hello

My wife and I saw a friends home where she used Melamine paint on cabinets and it looked really good.

Weeks later, we went to our closest Home depot, and we enquired about this project. We got the brochure for CIL's Melamine paint. The associate said we could choose colours aside from what what was on the CIL Melamine brochure - we could pick colours from other paint cards and they could match it.

When we came back a few weeks later to the Home Depot, there were other associates at the paint counter. My wife showed a colour card glossier than what the CIL paint does and associate recommended we use Behr Alkyd Semi-gloss Enamel. He recommended we use a sponge brush, but we pointed out is furniture and he then recommended it a good brush.

Well the end result is a disaster. There is too much gloss and the gloss is inconsistent. The same panel may have two or distinct shades of color, depending on which direction we used the brush or roller. If I did the second coat of paint one day, came back the next and touched up a piece, it would have a different shade from surrounding pieces

Also, I guess because I was trying to drown out the primer, I may have put too much paint on the brush or roller and there are some terrible dabs

So we want to redo it and get the paint we should have got in the first place.

That raises the questions
  1. Do we remove the old paint, or paint over with primer
  2. Should we remove the dry paint marks even if we paint over
  3. If you recommend removing the paint, should it be sanded off or chemical stripper.

I am concerned about the chemicals. The doors are easy to take off and I can move the contents of the cabinets to another room. I am concerned about the wood dust in my kitchen and the fumes of chemicals

Given that there are brush marks, I am thinking sanding may be the way to go regardless of how messy it is.
 
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Old 07-25-14, 04:56 AM
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That is one of the problems with paint depts - the help normally isn't well trained

Latex enamel isn't a great choice for a cabinet finish although there is a big difference between the better latex enamels and their cheaper counterpart. I have very little hands on experience with Behr coatings but their reputation isn't the greatest.

What primer did you use? Normally a solvent base primer is needed over a cabinet's factory finish to insure good adhesion. Oil base enamels give the best wearing paint job but whites will yellow over time. Waterborne enamels which are the most expensive dry almost as hard as oil base but don't yellow any. Waterborne is my personal favorite!

Chemical stripping works best. Latex enamels don't sand all that well. The paint heats up when you sand it and 'melts' plugging the sandpaper in short order. Sometimes it will cause the paint to roll off of the substrate. If you only sand, I'd suggest starting out with 80 grit to remove the majority and then finish with 120-150 grit to smooth it out. You don't need to remove all the existing latex paint.


http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...t-repaint.html
 
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Old 07-25-14, 05:47 AM
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Mark: Don't know if it will change your response, but they used oil based paint, not latex:

associate recommended we use Behr Alkyd Semi-gloss Enamel
 
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Old 07-25-14, 05:53 AM
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How did I miss that

Oil base enamels are a lot easier to sand, well maybe not easier but none of the issues associated with sanding latex enamel.

As a rule, oil base enamels don't touch up well. It's usually best to repaint the whole door [or whatever] The texture plays a big part in how the paint reflects light. It's ok to brush and roll the cabinet but unless you can roll over 95% of the substrate [which will give it all a slight orange peel] you need to 'tip off' the rolled paint with a brush [lightly brush over the wet rolled paint] Generally the more oil base enamel you apply the shinier it will be.

I'd sand everything smooth and then either apply another coat of your enamel or switch to a semi-gloss enamel if the sheen is too much for your taste.
 
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Old 07-25-14, 06:42 AM
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This evening, when I go home, I will look up the primer we used and get back to you on that.

Because its a kitchen with food, plates, packages, we painted a portion at a time and only did the top cabinets.

We were taking the doors off and contents out of the cabinet and then painting. As we have limited space to move the contents of the cabinets, and were doing this after we come home from work in the evening, it resulted in us only doing the top cabinets before we realized the paint wasn't working out.

We have not primed or painted the bottom cabinets. I was just going to put the new primer and CIL Melamine paint on the cabinets without sanding as it has the original finish, but it seems I should sand that too
 
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Old 07-25-14, 09:55 AM
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It is always a good idea to sand prior to priming or painting! Sanding promotes good adhesion and will help remove or reduce any discrepancies on the substrate including brush/roller marks between coats.

I like to take a magic marker and mark the doors behind the hinges, and the back of the drawers. That way you know exactly which opening they go to. Even though they might be all the same size there is often minor differences that make them fit one hole better than the other.
 
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Old 07-25-14, 10:29 AM
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Yes, I had problems matching the door back with where they came from. Marker will do the trick.

For sanding, what do you prefer - traditional sandpaper or liquid sandpaper?
 
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Old 07-25-14, 10:33 AM
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I use both. Sandpaper will help level out the surface and reduce/eliminate brush/roller marks and anything else that has marred the substrate. Liquid deglossers clean and soften the existing finish which also promotes good adhesion. I normally sand and then use a rag wet with deglosser in place of a tac cloth.
 
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Old 07-28-14, 02:56 AM
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The primer was:

PREMIUM PLUS® All-In-One Primer & Sealer
Behr - PREMIUM PLUS® All-In-One Primer & Sealer customer reviews - product reviews - read top consumer ratings

The paint was:
Behr interor/exterior Alkyd Semi-gloss Enamale

To sand to repaint, one only needs to remove the gloss and not remove the previous layers of paint right?
 
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Old 07-28-14, 03:35 AM
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I've never used that primer so I really can't comment on it other than I would have preferred to use a solvent based primer on the cabinets. You are correct, you only need to sand down the gloss before applying another coat of paint - basically a thorough scuff sand.
 
 

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