re-glazing sashes


  #1  
Old 08-01-14, 03:12 PM
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re-glazing sashes

Hi folks Ė

Iím in the process of trying to re-glaze some of my windows.

(I canít remove the sashes to put them on a workbench because of the way the sash channels are fastened to the jamb. You canít get to the screws to remove the sashes and channels. Another story- lol).

Do you have to get down to the bare wood in the rabbets before you add the glazing, or can you put new glazing on top of some of the old glazing, provided the old glazing is really stuck on solid. The glazing you see in the pics is really stuck on and is not very thick. But Iím afraid that new glazing wonít adhere properly to the old glazing.

I know that when you get to the bare wood you should prime with an oil base primer and you should be good to go. But Iím guessing that you should NOT put new glazing on top of old glazing, even if it is a an thin layer of the old glazing. So I assume I have to keep going to get down to the bare wood.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

p.s. just noticed that i must be digging into the rabbet with my tools - i know that's not right.





 
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Old 08-01-14, 04:14 PM
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It appears that the glazing putty you show in the pictures is well adhered to the wood.

I would let it be and prime over it. When the primer dries I would then do the standard putty glazing. Sand the edge where the face of the rabbet is to the outside before you prime so that your glazing knife will have a smooth ride along that edge.

What glazing compound are you going to use?

It also appears that there is some evidence of mildew along that one edge so you should treat that prior to priming so that it does not creep in to the new job.
 
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Old 08-01-14, 05:10 PM
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Hi calvert -

Thanks for the response. I was planning on using Sherwin Williams 66 or Dap33. I have both from last year when I did another window (I just canít remember whether I got down to bare wood in the rabbets at that time? I usually keep notes, but not that time. My bad, lol).

I notice that both products say remove all the old glazing, but I was hoping that actually isnít absolutely necessary as long as you are sure you have a good solid base.

The glazing stuck on there now is really stuck. Iíd be extremely happy to use that as a base. lol Iíll be sure to get the edge smooth for the putty knife guide as you say. Didnít notice the mildew but Iíll be sure to get that.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 08-01-14, 08:11 PM
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Do what Calvert says, You'll be OK. You don't need to go crazy but try to smooth out as much of the old stuff as possible. I'm the window and screen guy at work. I've seen just about everything and in all stages from great condition to rotted out frames. And all the client want's is new glass and glazing. I'll use linseed oil to coat the wood then put on either UGL or DAP brand glazing. They both are OK. Sometimes the consistency is different between cans but not enough to make a difference. What is important is that you paint it soon after. I attach this sticker to all my glazing jobs before giving back to customer,

Attn: Customer
For best results, glazing should be painted after it is applied.
For latex paint let cure several days
For oil paint let cure overnight.
 

Last edited by Norm201; 08-01-14 at 08:26 PM.
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Old 08-02-14, 03:16 AM
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I prefer SWP's 66 glazing - it's not as oily as DAP 33. While I always try to remove whatever is loose, I've never worried about removing it all.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 08:17 AM
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Norm201 Ė

Do what Calvert says, You'll be OK. You don't need to go crazy but try to smooth out as much of the old stuff as possible. I'm the window and screen guy at work. I've seen just about everything and in all stages from great condition to rotted out frames. And all the client want's is new glass and glazing. I'll use linseed oil to coat the wood then put on either UGL or DAP brand glazing. They both are OK. Sometimes the consistency is different between cans but not enough to make a difference. What is important is that you paint it soon after. I attach this sticker to all my glazing jobs before giving back to customer,

Attn: Customer
For best results, glazing should be painted after it is applied.
For latex paint let cure several days
For oil paint let cure overnight.
Oh you are making me very good Norm. lol. Good to hear this from a pro. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Thanks for the good information. I had forgotten about UGL. But I did hear of it before. Thanks for the help.

marksr

I prefer SWP's 66 glazing - it's not as oily as DAP 33. While I always try to remove whatever is loose, I've never worried about removing it all.
Thanks mark. I knew you were a pro and liked SWP 66. Iím happy to hear you say you never worried about removing it all Ė real happy! lol Thanks for your help.
 
 

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