Prime new Pella windows with pine interior


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Old 10-11-14, 06:21 AM
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Prime new Pella windows with pine interior

Think I know the answer to this question, but couldn't find it on the site. I'm sure I missed it.

Just replace some windows, clad exterior pine interior. We are going to paint the interior white, but do I need to prime first?

Thank you!
 
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Old 10-11-14, 06:26 AM
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Yes, you need to prime raw wood! Use an oil base or latex enamel undercoater.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 06:30 AM
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If they haven't been pre-primed by the factory, then yes. I bought some Jeld-wen windows a couple years ago, and I had the choice to have them primed for me.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 06:34 AM
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Yeah, wishing I had gone with that option as well.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 06:36 AM
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I don't always trust factory primer and will often reprime them before applying the finish paint. Some factory primers don't seal as well as they ought to and will suck some of the sheen out of the enamel. Don't forget to sand the primer prior to applying the enamel.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 06:37 AM
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That's what I thought! Thanks!
 
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Old 10-11-14, 06:52 AM
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Depending what kind of window you have (casement, DH) you might consider removing the sashes and laying them on a bench to paint if it makes your life easier. Although it's kinda cold this morning to be opening windows.

With casements, I like to be able to paint the edges of the sash right up to the fin weatherstripping. With double hungs, you shouldn't paint the sides at all. And if you have the type with the wood veneered interior storm panel, you just paint what you can see without actually opening that storm panel. I will usually spend part of a day just masking the glass and other parts off (removing every part that can be removed) so as to keep them clean.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 08:49 AM
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IMO removing the windows is usually more trouble/effort than it's worth ..... but I've probably painted a thousand windows over the years It is important [no matter what type of window] to not close it up tight until the paint has cured [may take a day or two] this will prevent the paint from sticking both making it hard to reopen the window and damage the paint job. I like to paint any/all exposed wood.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 09:07 AM
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I'm usually doing them in a shop before they are even installed... so disassembly is pretty much the only way to go. When you can do it in a shop, the time spent disassembling so that you can paint assembly line style is well worth the effort. I've never painted a window in place in a house so I'm just the opposite of you mark. I can't imagine being able to lean out a casement window and get all 4 edges... especially with the hardware in the way. On double hungs I usually will see painters skip the back side of the meeting rail. Then when someone raises the window you see bare wood from the outside.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 09:13 AM
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I don't know if I've ever painted a window before it was installed. There are a lot of folks that paint that either aren't real painters or not very conscientious. Not only do many of them forget to paint the outside and top/bottom edge on a casement, on double hungs, many will fail to paint the top edge of the window on the bottom sash. You have to lower the top sash and raise the bottom one to access it. Easy to do, I don't know why so many don't
 
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Old 10-11-14, 09:21 AM
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There are a lot of folks that paint that either aren't real painters
That's ME! I'm not a real painter but I've gotten pretty good at paint, stain, lacquer, etc. via lots and lots of window & trim work.

Out here in the sticks you kind of have to be a jack of all trades. Some are "masters of none." But if you can master lots of things you're a pretty popular guy.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 11:45 AM
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Trying to do a good job is the main thing! I painted for 10yrs or so before I started doing it professionally and had to unlearn a few bad habits. Most folks can do a decent job of painting if they take their time - especially with a little guidance on the correct coatings/procedure.

I've gone to church with some folks that think I'm a good carpenter just because I can build a wheelchair ramp or make repairs on their house. While there are a lot of things I can do well enough so I don't have to pay a pro - painting is the only thing I'm a pro at.
 
 

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