A purple problem (tinted ceiling paint).


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Old 11-14-14, 06:20 PM
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A purple problem (tinted ceiling paint).

I'm not really sure where to post this. I'm not redesigning a kitchen or bathroom.... (just did that) .... so hopefully, this is the right category.

I have a question about the ceiling paint home improvement stores sell that has a purple tint (to let you know where you've missed a spot) but dries white. I used it on my ceiling and it was fine, until I saw a place I needed to touch up. When I touched it up, I guess it reactivated the purple tint and now there's this lavender splotch on my ceiling that won't go away. I went back over it with original oil-based Kilz then came back with a coat of matte white ceiling paint (this time without the purple tint) but it's still lavender! I cannot believe that Kilz couldn't cover this up! It's drywall ceiling. Please don't tell me I have to cut that part out, patch, tape, mud, sand, etc. I'm recently post neck surgery and rotator cuff surgery, so if that is my only solution, I'm ready to start crying, loud and long. (Okay, at this point, I would hire that done, but still...) Is there really no way to get rid of the lavender? If I redo my entire ceiling with Kilz and come back with white paint, will it just reactive the purple tint elsewhere on the ceiling? I mean, it didn't help with this splotch to "Kilz" it and repaint. I can't see how re-priming and painting the entire ceiling will fix it, since that's exactly what I just did over the bad spot, with no improvement. I may be a girl, but I'm not into lavender ceilings.

No more fancy ceiling paint for me.


EDIT: I've just discovered that there is a "Painting" forum. I'm so sorry to have posted this in "Walls and Ceilings". Please move it, if you see fit. Thanks.
 

Last edited by IAmGrammy; 11-14-14 at 06:27 PM. Reason: Wrong category?
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Old 11-17-14, 05:35 PM
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Well, alrighty then..... Kind of need to get it done this week. I'll figure something out.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 03:20 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Sorry your post got overlooked not sure how that happened

I've only painted a couple of ceilings with that tint changing ceiling paint - I don't care much for it. IMO regular flat wall paint covers and applies better.

Have you looked at the 'lavender' spot in different lighting to rule out it being a reflection? The oil base primer should have sealed the ceiling preventing anything from bleeding thru the new paint. Just applying primer in spots will cause the top coat to dry slower but it should dry like the rest. Worst case scenario would be to prime the entire ceiling and then repaint but that shouldn't be necessary. Have you tried contacting the primer manufacture and see what they say?
 
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Old 11-18-14, 07:19 AM
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Hi, marksr, and thanks so much for the reply.

I'm afraid I can rule out its being a reflection. It's a very obvious 2 ft X 3ft field of "light purple". I'm stumped as to why the original Kilz oil-based paint didn't cover it. I let it dry completely (and it dried lavender) and then came back with a very white matte ceiling paint but it's not budging.

I'll send an email to the Kilz and Valspar people and see what they suggest. Thanks again, so much!
 
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Old 11-18-14, 07:53 AM
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Not fun but I'd be inclined to repaint the whole ceiling with a white only ceiling paint.

No guarantee on that, though.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 10:50 AM
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If the Kilz and Valspar people don't have a ready solution, then I have to, mitch17. This ceiling splotch is like something from "Beyond Belief: Fact or Fiction". (Creepy). It's gotta go.

 
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Old 11-18-14, 10:57 AM
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I'm not a big fan of the primer+paint or the pink to white paint. Worst case scenario is to scrap he area and re-prime then use a very high quality paint (not Velspar...that is the house brand and not good), go with something like DutchBoy.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 11:09 AM
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DutchBoy like most paint manufactures has good and bad paint. It's more important to buy the better line of someone's paint than just go by the brand name. I use a lot of SWP and they have some fine paint but they also have some garbage that isn't fit to be applied to the wall, IMO. I know very little about Valspar's modern day paint line up but 40 yrs ago they did sell some of the better exterior oil base house paint.

I'm also not a fond of the primer in the paint gimmick. I've always found wall paint to roll/spray better and touch up better than ceiling paints. Ceiling paints typically have less sheen than most flat latex paints but I don't like how they go on compared to other latex paints.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 11:15 AM
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Mark brings up a good point - might be worth putting a flat wall paint on the ceiling instead. FWIW, the walls and ceilings in my house all have the same flat white paint on them and it works pretty well (same orange peel texture also).
 
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Old 11-18-14, 12:01 PM
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That reminds me of the purple disappearing pen I sometimes use when I sew. Most of the time, it disappears quick, but sometimes (depending on the fabric) it doesn't. However, in time it will.
I'm thinking that perhaps, it will disappear on it's own eventually.
FWIW, we always use regular flat paint on the ceiling, too.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 06:52 PM
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Thanks, everyone! I've never tried Dutch Boy paints but I've heard good things about them. I usually use Valspar's Signature paint. It's quite thick and covers well, but I've never used it as a ceiling paint. I'll have a go at it with the flat wall paint and see how that plays out. If I still can't get it to leave, I'm calling in a paranormal! *kidding*
 
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Old 11-19-14, 03:24 AM
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Most any wall paint is a superior grade compared to most any 'ceiling' paint. The manufacture knows they can cheat on the formula because the ceiling doesn't really see any wear and isn't likely to ever be washed.
 
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Old 11-25-14, 02:14 PM
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marker, you are right on point with what you said. I bought a quart of really nice (expensive) wall paint and the little test patch I've done today has dried white! Break out the bubbly!

I still can't figure out why the Kilz didn't cover it, but the high quality wall paint did the job. Thanks so much!
 
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Old 11-25-14, 02:17 PM
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Glad you got it worked out

I still can't figure out why the Kilz didn't cover it
That doesn't make sense to me either but - all's well that ends well
 
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Old 11-26-14, 07:16 AM
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Yeah, if you had told me you had used latex Kilz I could understand issues but the original oil based Kilz is a good product
 
 

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