painting over wood shelves?

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Old 12-04-14, 08:17 AM
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painting over wood shelves?

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I have decided to paint this set up shelves in my rental since they have gotten beat up over the years.
I actually wanted to do minimal prep to be honest as Im running on some borrowed time and need to get this done.
Im painting them with a semi gloss behr paint/primer in one I use for all my trim and windows/doors.
I tried just hitting a small spot with the paint but of course it doesnt adhere.
I was going to try and give it a quick sand tonight but was wondering what primer might be good to go with.
I just used Gripper on the kitchen cabinets there and it worked fairly well but I honestly could have prepped them better. It turned into a much more complicated job than I wanted. just YEARS of caked on grime and old stain.clear that I could not get off enough.

Anyway I could get a few cans of oil based kilz or would another quart of gripper be okay with this. I would like it to be fairly durable but it doesnt need to be invincible since it will now have to be repainted every time someone moves out anyway.

thanks
 
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Old 12-04-14, 08:24 AM
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Oil based primer followed by an enamel paint. Mark will tell you waterborne enamel is best and my 2 would be not to use oil based enamel in white as it tends to yellow with age.

It never hurts to scuff sand first as well.
 
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Old 12-04-14, 10:09 AM
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Most any interior oil base primer will do ok, including the oil base Kilz. You need to sand lightly first, remove any wax/polish if applicable. Painting stained/poly'd wood is generally a 3 coat process; 1 coat primer, 2 coats finish.

Oil base and waterborne enamels will wear the best. Some of the cheaper latex enamels are prone to blocking [sticking/peeling when items are set on them for any period of time] As Mitch stated, oil base whites will yellow/amber over time. I prefer waterborne enamel as it dries almost as hard as oil, doesn't yellow and dries fast/cleans up with water like latex. I normally use SWP's ProClassic waterborne enamels but B.Moore and others also have quality waterborne enamels for sale.

Painted shelves will be a maintenance issue! A light sanding and fresh coat of poly might make more sense. A satin poly won't highlight the defects as much as a gloss finish will.
 
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Old 12-05-14, 06:27 AM
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these things were beat. In the pic they look WAY better than in person. I gave them a light sand, good cleaning and hit them with oil kilz complete last night.

Looks good white. Ill look into the waterborne paint at SW since there are stores all around me. Hopefully its sold in qts since a gallon would be overkill since I thin everything (can flotrol be used with waterborne?). Only took 3/4 a qrt to prime the entire thing and I went fairly heavy and it was THICK stuff (didnt thin the primer).
 
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Old 12-05-14, 07:50 AM
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I don't know if you can get waterborne in qts but if you need 2 qts, you've pretty much paid for a gallon. The ProClassic is pricey but SWP now has waterborne in their ProMar 200 line which should be a good bit cheaper. I've used a lot of the ProMar 200 coatings but I haven't had occasion to try the 200 waterborne .... but would expect it to do a good job.

Floetrol can probably be used with waterborne but I have never done so. I generally apply coatings full strength. The few times that I have thinned waterborne I just used a tad of water.
 
 

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