oil on wall that needs painting, help!!!!!!!!


  #1  
Old 03-23-01, 07:26 AM
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OK, here's the problem, I bought some nice smelling, bright pink oil and put it in a burner. The water evaporated and the oil spattered all over my light colored walls. I have cleaned it with a special cleaner, covered it with a sealant and it is still coming through. I want to paint the walls with latex (water based paint). Does anyone have any ideas how I can solve this without painting the wall bright pink to match the stain?
 
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Old 03-23-01, 08:25 AM
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I think your kitchin would look lovely in bright pink!!

If you don`t agree then paint the areas with one coat of non drip gloss (OIL BASED).....And then leave for a couple of days untill the paint has cured. Repeat the process(not usually necessary but guarantees results}
Then....paint over with your finish colour and the oil stain will "go away" for ever & ever!!
PROMISE!!
 
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Old 03-23-01, 08:50 AM
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thankyou soooooooooooooooooo much for your answer!!!!!!!!!! I knew there would be a simple solution, at least now I don't have to use bright pink paint or knock the wall down!!!!
 
  #4  
Old 03-23-01, 11:31 AM
mikejmerritt
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Hey toptosher, Just curious why you would use oil paint(which will work) rather then a fast drieing stain killer either oil or alcohol based? Not questioning your always great advice, just curious....Mike
 
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Old 03-23-01, 11:40 AM
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probably as most ppl have pots of oil based paints in their shed from painting woodwork and therefore won't have to buy another product(?)
 
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Old 03-23-01, 11:59 AM
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Yeah....Stain killers are excellent and do the same job even quicker...But if its just a one off then like cozz says,why not use the gloss in the shed?
 
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Old 03-23-01, 12:17 PM
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used stain killer and it didn't help at all. I followed the instructions to the letter but go no results, just scraped knuckles! Then when dry, I painte over the stain with some sealant type stuff and it still came through 3 thick coats of white latex!!!!!!!!!!
Will be trying the oil based paint tomorrow when the latex has hardend, thanks again :-)
 
  #8  
Old 03-23-01, 03:18 PM
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Cozz, So all that come after us will know you said: used stain killer and it didn't help at all. I followed the instructions to the letter but go no results, just scraped knuckles! Then when dry, I painte over the stain with some sealant type stuff and it still came through 3 thick coats of white latex!!!!!!!!!! Was it an oil stainkiller? Did you apply two coats? I find it hard to believe that a quality stainkiller(oil) wouldn't kill a small oil stain. Let us know!
As for advising oil as a stain killer if a DIY had oil it would be fine but if I hadn't posed a question as to why I see many running out and buying a quart of high gloss oil when that really wouldn't be the thing to buy or use. Two reasons: First the high gloss oil would cost at least twice as much as a fine oil or alcohol stainkiller and after priming with high gloss oil a person would need to spot prime the area once or twice with a flat paint or primer to make sure that the deep thin tint base made Victorian colors that are so much the rage(at least in the states) will cover and dry out in an acceptable way. If you look at the many, many views that DIY gets every day we owe it to the people to make it clear when we are advising a "get buy on the cheap" or a truly professional line of thought. OK, blast me if I'm wrong guys....Mike
 
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Old 03-24-01, 01:31 AM
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I did use a quality oil stain remover, the cheap ones are just not good enough. I think the problem is that the oil stain is on a latex covered plasterboard wall in our extension that absorbed it and the fact that the stuff was bright pink and perfumed doesn't help either. If the stain was small and, say, from normal cooking oil, I think stain killers would do the trick.
The stain however is not small, it is one meter up the wall and half a meter across the ceiling! I was using a big plant to disguise it The point we were making is that virtually every DIY fanatic will have a can of gloss paint in the shed from painting doors or window frames, go and have a look, I bet you all do! Of course we were not suggesting going out and buying a can of gloss paint as that would be alot more expensive, though I suppose you could buy a tester pot
If the stain is small, use stain remover, if a whopper, use gloss either from your shed or lend it from your neighbour!
 
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Old 03-24-01, 02:14 PM
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This question came up about 22 years ago when I was at building/decorating college. The answer?
Back then products such as stain block were not available to us and the correct way to block out stains caused by water,oil etc was good old fashioned .......Gloss!
Now days ,old habits die hard and because this method has never failed to work for me and other "Professional" decorators that I have worked with,I can recomend this solution to the DIY sector with confidence!!
Now days I use stain block simply because of the time factor and drying times but still use the gloss method when there is no S/B on site.
If the D I Y` er has gloss left over in the shed (a sensible shade,addmitted) Then I would advise them to use it as an equally good alternative.
{no disclaimer required)

 
 

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