What will happen if I paint over this?


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Old 01-11-15, 02:38 PM
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What will happen if I paint over this?

If I get white paint and a roller and paint over this kind of wall, what will happen?

My goal is to have it smoother (flatter and less textured) and solid white. I'm sure it won't be perfect, but I am afraid in my ignorance I might end up making it worse.

Thanks.

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Old 01-11-15, 03:19 PM
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One trick you can try is to just get paint on the wall using your roller. Then use a sheet rock taping knife and drag it across the surface at a 45 degree angle. This will leave paint in the low spots and scrape it off the high areas, smoothing out the finish. You can apply more coats until you get the smoothness you want.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 04:03 PM
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Rrosai:

If you paint over what you have, you will have very much the same texture as you have now, only in a different colour.

What you should do is go to any paint store and buy a "Block Filler" primer.

Such a primer is very much thicker than ordinary latex primer and is intended to be used over bare concrete blocks to establish a very much smoother surface for a subsequent coat of paint. The texture you're dealing with there is about the same roughness as concrete block, so I expect a block filler primer would be well suited to this project.

KILZ PRO-X p50 Block Filler Primer

(Kilz makes good products, but I expect anyone's block filler primer will work well for you.)

I have never needed to use a block filler primer, but I know of the product. My understanding is that you apply it to the surface of the blocks with a 3/8 or 1/2 inch nap roller.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 03:37 AM
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What is the wall made up of? Normally you'd skim coat the wall with joint compound to level it out but I'd want to know more about the wall before suggesting you do that. I would think it would take too many coats to do a decent job of filling the low spots with paint. I've applied a lot of block fill but have never used it on anything other than masonry [what it's formulated for] While it would 'texture' the wall, I doubt it would evenly fill what is there. The main purpose of block fill is to fill the voids/pores in block making it ready for paint. I'm not sure you can buy small quantities of block fill as I've never gotten any that wasn't in 5 gallon buckets or bigger drums.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 01-12-15, 07:25 AM
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I'm with Mark - what is that surface? In the picture it looks like cloth or wallpaper, which I would be trying to remove, not cover.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 07:58 AM
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I'm wondering if it's one of those prefinished panels you see in some offices. It's been a long time since I've been around them and can't remember how they are made
 
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Old 01-12-15, 01:21 PM
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That stuff to me looks like commercial wallpaper.

Commercial wallpaper is a completely different beast than residential wallpaper; it comes in 54 inch widths typically has a much deeper texture to it than residential wallpaper. I've never installed commercial wallpaper, but from what I understand, you don't just butt the edges of the strips together like you do with residential wallpaper. Instead, you overlap the edges taking care to match the pattern, and then cut through both pieces of wallpaper at the overlap, remove the two scrap pieces and press the cut edges down for an invisible seam.
 
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Old 01-15-15, 04:44 AM
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Thanks.

I don't know what it is. The depressions are not uniform in shape but they are in a grid pattern. It's slightly soft and there are definite seams so I guess it's a type of wallpaper or similar.

I just wanted to improve the image from my projector by making the wall in question solid white and maybe less bumpy. I don't care what it looks like other than that. I would shell out for a screen but I can't find one big enough.

If I need more than a ladder, a roller and paint it's probably more trouble than it's worth.
 
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Old 01-15-15, 04:54 AM
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Usually it's best to strip wallpaper, repair the wall then prime and paint. There are wall panels that have a paper coating that isn't stripable but they come in 4' wide sections with some type of molding to hide the joints.

Just painting the wallpaper will do little more than change the color. Multiple coats of paint will lessen the texture but will never make it go away.
 
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Old 01-15-15, 09:00 AM
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You've tried hanging up a plain white sheet?
 
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Old 01-22-15, 04:58 PM
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I used to use a white sheet but could never get it completely flat and it's not big enough this time.

Anyway, I went ahead and tried it to okay results. The texture is less noticeable and more uniform and the off-white spots are gone. I guess I can add more layers to flatten the texture if it bothers me.

Sadly though, after I got done I accidentally pulled some of the wallpaper off and discovered that it can be easily pulled off by hand. Which means that I could have just ripped it off and painted the wood for better results using less paint. Live and learn I guess.

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Anyway thanks for the info.
 
 

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