Prep work to paint gorilla glue


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Old 05-07-15, 05:59 AM
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Prep work to paint gorilla glue

I've used gorilla glue to repair an interior window sill. After I sand, what prep cleaning is needed before primering? And how much dry time after cleaning until i should prime?
 
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Old 05-07-15, 07:00 AM
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Latex primers/paints don't generally adhere great to glue. I'd use either an oil base primer or a pigmented shellac like Zinnser's BIN. Latex enamel is fine for the top coat.

I'm not sure how long you need to let the glue dry but you do want to make sure it's had plenty of time to dry.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 12:22 PM
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Thanks marksr. I have zinnser 123 bullseye water based primer. No good?

So today I sanded the gorilla glue. This is my first time working with this, and I have little painting experience, so I must say that the glue after being sanded, is super porous, and soft, and I can rub spots bare with my fingernail if I scrape at it enough. Is this normal???? I'm wondering if I should just sand all of it off and use something else.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 12:25 PM
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I want to add that I'm not going for great cosmetics here, but rather just a solid coat that will hold up. It's a window sill on an interior of my NYC apartment. It's old and ragged. Doesn't need to look perfect, as long as the glue and paint adhere properly, I'm happy.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 12:32 PM
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The 123 might be ok although a solvent based primer would definitely be better. You could try it and if the primer crawls any - switch to a solvent based primer.

Wood glue isn't normally used as a filler or expected to be sanded. If you post a pic or two of the window sill we'd have a better idea of what you are trying to do - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 05-07-15, 12:48 PM
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Here's a pic. It's my window sill. There is a piece of wood shaped just like a baseboard that runs across. It had developed some cracks and was loose. I injected the gorilla glue underneath it to hold it in place and then filled in some cracks with it. It's holding great, and does not move whatsoever now. However, the surface glue that will be painted is what concerns me now. It's soft and porous.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 12:52 PM
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FWIW, it's the original expanding gorilla glue, not the wood glue.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 01:51 PM
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After 24 hours that glue is pretty hard.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 02:01 PM
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I'd apply a thin coat of spackling or joint compound to level it out, sand when dry, remove the dust, prime and paint. The 123 primer is ideal for going over the spackling or j/c.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 02:02 PM
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The spackling will adhere to the sanded gorilla glue?
 
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Old 05-07-15, 02:07 PM
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I would think that it would however I've never spread wood glue over an entire surface before [just in the cracks or when gluing two pieces of wood together.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 04:04 PM
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That crack looked pretty big, in terms of missing wood. I personally would use All Purpose Bondo (different from automotive Bondo) to fill in the crack. Then sand/prime/paint. Spackle is meant for nail holes not large voids, joint compound will not expand and contract with humidity changes of the wood and will crack. The glue itself was never intended to be a finished surface
 
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Old 05-07-15, 05:53 PM
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I decided I'm going to sand down all the glue. I think the picture was bad quality and misleading. There actually aren't big cracks or holes that IMO need bondo.

That said, since it is wood, wouldn't it be better to use wood filler to fill in the cracks and nail holes? Or spackling paste?

Also, some spots are bare wood. Can wood filler (such as elmers wood filler) be applied to bare wood or must I primer first? I know spackling paste cannot be used on bare wood.

Thank you all for your comments.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 06:08 PM
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Wood filler is designed for small imperfections in a wood surface. It is not designed to do structural repairs and/or wear surface repairs. Remove the excess glue, apply the bondo, sand smooth and finish. You will never know you had a less than perfect sill to begin with. Trust me on this one.
 
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Old 05-07-15, 06:18 PM
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These are small imperfections. That big blob in the picture is peeling paint. Once I injected glue underneath and solidified it from moving, the only thing left is peeling paint all over and little nail holes. Still suggest bondo?

If I go with bondo, I'd still like to know if wood filler can go on bare wood, for future reference, and can bondo go on bare wood also?

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-08-15, 03:31 AM
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If the wood needs to be built up - use a wood filler or bondo, if you just need to level out the surface to hide the different levels of paint and make the repaired cracks invisible - spackling or j/c will be fine.
Painter's putty is normally used to fill nail holes but if you are going over the wood with filler that can be skipped. Bondo and most wood fillers are designed to go over raw wood.
 
 

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