how to dull satin paint


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Old 05-13-15, 09:35 AM
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how to dull satin paint

I just painted a hallway with 1 coat of satin paint (light green/blue behr marque) and it is a bit too shiny. Would giving the paint a light sand with fine grit sandpaper make it less shiny? Would it mess up the paint? any other suggestions?

Thanks
 
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Old 05-13-15, 12:11 PM
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Sanding should dull the finish but not sure how even you would be able to make it. It would make the paint's finish less durable. If I couldn't live with it, I'd mix in some flat latex [same color] to the eggshell enamel and apply another coat - be sure to mix it well!!
 
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Old 05-13-15, 02:46 PM
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I'd live with it, the more sheen the easier to clean.
 
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Old 05-13-15, 03:54 PM
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I'd live with it, the more sheen the easier to clean.
I agree with Joe, plus if you give it 6 months you won't even notice the sheen.
 
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Old 05-13-15, 04:44 PM
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I dis-agree about living with it. If you don't like it, change it. Geez, it's your home! I also had an encounter with Velspar paint. Bought satin. It was like a high gloss. Lowes refused to make good on it. I had to call the corporate office to get satisfaction. I instead went back to my old reliable Dutch Boy paint and it's perfect. I'll never experiment again with another brand of paint. Even though S-W makes Dutch Boy along with several other brands, I'll stick with a tried and true that I'm confident with.
 
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Old 05-15-15, 09:33 AM
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Thanks for the heads up on not sanding. I could repaint it, but I don't mind it that much.
 
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Old 05-15-15, 09:35 AM
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Probably a good choice usually once you get your mind focused on the next project [or whatever] you'll more or less forget the little things that bug you about the current one.

Bought satin. It was like a high gloss. Lowes refused to make good on it. I had to call the corporate office to get satisfaction
Sounds like maybe the paint was mis labeled, if so the factory knew about it and knew they had to make it right with whoever complained.
 
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Old 05-15-15, 02:08 PM
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We sell DutchBoy and Pratt and Lambert paints along with a house brand, all made by S-W. We almost always give the customer the benefit of the doubt. When I mix one or multiple cans of stain or paint I'll use a paint stick and sample each can to show the customer what they are getting. This will almost always prevent any sort of misunderstanding. Seldom do we get complaints and if we do, we re-do it.
 
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Old 05-15-15, 02:21 PM
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Some "satins" are more "Satiny" than others. There usually is a sample board of the different sheens posted somewhere for reference. Also, if you painted a different color, you are noticing it more now because of the change more than the sheen.

I had a client choose a color and was not home when we painted. Came home a swore that we put the wrong color on the wall and that it was not what she requested. I asked her if she had the paint sample from the store. She got it, we held it up to the wall and it was an exact match. She was just taken back by the color change from neutral beige to a minty green. After a couple of days she told me that she really liked it now that the furniture was put back and drapes and pictures put up.
 
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Old 05-15-15, 02:29 PM
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I don't know why but there isn't an industry standard for sheens I've even seen sheen differences in different lines by the same paint manufacturer. Satin and eggshell enamels are more or less the same but while some will have an identical sheen level, others may be quite a bit different.

Satin sheens are most prominent when viewed from an angle. The perception of a color can change a lot depending on lighting and surrounding colors. I recently painted our bed rm. My wife wanted a tan that would go with her new bedspread and curtains. So I mixed up what I knew would look good. She didn't trust me and wanted a sample on the wall which she claimed the color was no good. I went ahead and painted anyway and now she claims it's the perfect color
 
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Old 05-15-15, 04:15 PM
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I always tell customers to bring their color sample to the front window before I'll mix it to see it under natural lighting . Or I'll ask them what kind of lighting they might have for a particular room. A bedroom with bright morning sun coming through will tend to wash out a little, vs a western or setting sun that will tend to have a slight darkness to it. If its a room with a north facing side then I tell them to look at the sample color with the kind of lighting used in that room. My kitchen for instance only has a north facing window, so our overheard light is on most of the time.
 
 

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