Repaint or stain previously painted deck?


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Old 05-26-15, 11:40 AM
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Repaint or stain previously painted deck?

My deck (350 sqft, not counting staircase) was painted red by previous owner, and now paint started to peel off. I'm thinking treating it this season, but was very hesitant to DIY because most of the advise I got, no matter repaint or stain involves a deep sanding off the existing paint, which sounds like a very exhausting thing to do.

I don't have any exterior painting experience except repainting rusty stair railings. Can you guys give me some suggestions on what exactly I should do, and what type of tools/equipment I need to rent/buy (for example, I know HD can rent out sander, but I don't what type I should get).

Thanks so much.
 
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Old 05-26-15, 12:44 PM
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The only sanding I've ever done on a deck was to smooth out handrails or fix 'fuzzed up' wood where someone used too much pressure when cleaning the deck. Most decking is face nailed/screwed and those nail heads would destroy sandpaper in short order.

To prep a deck, I mix up bleach and water [never stronger than 50%] and apply it to the deck with a pump up garden sprayer, let it set but not dry and rinse with a pressure washer. A garden hose will also work. Scrubbing the deck with an old broom may help to remove a lot of the peeling paint.

Depending on how it looks once cleaned I'd probably apply a coat or two of solid deck stain instead of going back with paint.
 
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Old 05-26-15, 03:54 PM
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Got a picture?
100% of the time a pressure treated wood is going to peel off if its painted.
Painting it red is going to be to hot to walk on and fail faster.
No way would I be renting anything.
Waiting for those pictures.
 
  #4  
Old 05-26-15, 04:18 PM
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Unless you get "ALL" of the paint off, any stain is just going to ride on top of the original paint.

It may be easier to rebuild the deck with new wood than to get "ALL" of the paint off.

A Glidden representative (and Home Buyer/Seller of mine) once told me that the behavior of stain and paint can hardly be distinguished once you get away from "transparent" stain. The semi-transparent and opaque stains carry so much pigment that they seldom soak into the wood . . . . so it lays on top and ultimately just peels off. Humidity captured within the wood will accelerate this lifting. You may as well re-paint.

My 20 year old deck is about 580 SF and has been a constant source of irritation and re-learning . . . . and costly too, maintaining a special snow-thrower that won't scar the wood while I remove tons of snow every year for fear that the deck will be torn from the sill it's bolted into.

Until my dying day, I'll rue the day I opted to put this deck up . . . . but being in Real Estate I see other people repeating my mistake every year.
 
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Old 05-27-15, 12:51 PM
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Here are the pictures. I asked around just wanting to find a better compromise. If I need to hire someone, I might have to go through that as well, it's just a lot of "deals" I found on Angies List only cover 200 sqft, and when you go up the size, it becomes significant more expensive, I saw one deal asking for $1400 for up to 400sqft (power pressure wash+repaint or stain), steps are extra. And I seriously doubt those guys would be willing to stripping "all of my old paint" out for that price...
 
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Old 05-27-15, 01:29 PM
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While it's hard to say for sure, that looks like a solid stain and not paint. After cleaning and removing loose paint there shouldn't be any issues with applying a coat of solid deck stain over it.
 
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Old 05-27-15, 01:35 PM
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Exactly how you can tell if it's solid color stain or paint? And what type of chemical stripping do you guys recommend? So no sanding involved?
 
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Old 05-27-15, 01:40 PM
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Solid stain is very similar to paint but thinner. From the pic it doesn't look like the coating is thick enough to be paint. While that is my educated guess - it's still a guess, hard to say for certain from a pic.

Often washing the deck and then pressure washing will remove all/most of the loose stain. There are deck strippers available although I rarely use them. I normally just use a bleach/water solution although adding TSP helps if the deck is extra grimy or existing finish is chalky.
 
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Old 06-05-15, 06:05 AM
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Back with questions again, first of all, I found the leftover stain, previous owner used Bher waterproof wood stain (for siding, fence, deck), in red color.

1. Will a 1600psi electric pressure washer do the job of cleaning/prepping the deck?
2. What type of paint/stain stripper do you recommend?
3. I roughly estimate that the deck is around 400-450 sqft including the steps and railings, how much paint/stain do I need if I want to do two coats?
4. Sherwin Williams is running 40% sale, and I heard they are much better than HD/Lowes paint/stain, any recommendation if I want to use solid stain? I see their stain are labeled waterborne, is it the same as water-based when referring to paint? I heard they are not durable compared to oil-based in exterior applications.

Thanks a lot.
 

Last edited by Mr.Nobody; 06-05-15 at 06:46 AM.
  #10  
Old 06-05-15, 06:28 AM
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Whatever pressure washer you use, beware that it'll eat right through the planks if you tarry. Plan your work and then work your plan. Don't permit any distractions !

My Wife used a gas powered pressure washer on our deck a few years ago, and it still bears many, many scars where she paused to get a particular stain while the water chewed/gouged the wood as if someone had used a chisel to make indentations.

Years later, those scars still provide fodder for many conversations.
 

Last edited by Vermont; 06-05-15 at 06:49 AM.
  #11  
Old 06-05-15, 06:45 AM
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While I'm not fond of electric pressure washers, that one should do an adequate job. Pressure washing makes the job easier but you should not rely on pressure to do the cleaning for the reasons mentioned above.

I've had good results with SWP's DeckScapes. As far as I know it still comes in waterborne and oil base along with latex for the solid stain. Which one holds up the best depends a lot on the environment it's used in. Here in Tn waterborne stains hold up well, when I lived in Fla, oil base stains had a very short life - it's best to inquire locally what works best in your climate.
 
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Old 06-05-15, 07:44 AM
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Finishes - Sherwin-Williams

1. Only two solid stains listed, one is IR reflective, one is not (could not find Deckspcapes on their site anymore). Is SW's stain any good compare to Behr or other HD/Lowes brands? And how many do I need for two coats at 400-450 sqft deck?
2. what type of stain stripper? Is SW's SuperDeck® Stain & Sealer Remover any good?
3. Brush, roller or spray? I do have a 1 gallon garden sprayer, don't know if it's ok for stain?
4. I know if I want to do everything right, I probably need to use sander to clean up all the old stain, which one should I rent: http://www.homedepot.com/c/tool_truc...tal_equipment? Is the small orbit sander OK or I should consider renting a squarebuff floor sander?
 
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Old 06-05-15, 08:12 AM
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#1 - Paint manufacture's coating line ups change over time and I've been retired for awhile so I'm not up on SWP's current coating lines But big box stores generally stock coatings based on low price rather than quality Paints stores also often sell cheap coating but as long as you get their top line [or close] you should have a quality coating.

#2 - I rarely use any stain strippers, generally cleaning the deck with TSP is enough.

#3 - It depends on the deck and it's surrounding but any coating that is sprayed onto wood benefits from being back rolled/brushed to work the coating into the wood. A pump up garden sprayer will only spray the thinnest deck stains which usually don't offer much long term protection.

#4 - I don't sand decks! A floor sander won't work well on a deck - the nail heads, gaps between boards and cracks/splinters will shred the sandpaper in short order. About the only sanding I'll do on a deck [besides the handrail] is a light sanding to minimize the 'fuzz' where someone messed up when cleaning the deck [either too much pressure or too strong a bleach mixture]
 
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Old 06-06-15, 09:23 AM
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@marksr

Do i need to strip down all the existing stain (exposing the wood surface) to re-stain it? Sounds like you were suggesting simply wash+pressure wash to remove the dirt and loose stain is good enough prepping.
 
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Old 06-06-15, 09:26 AM
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Assuming you are going to recoat with a solid deck stain all you need to do is make sure it's clean and any loose stain is removed. After PWing check it out and make sure there aren't areas that need further attention [scraping/sanding]
 
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Old 08-24-15, 07:26 PM
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I want to reiterate my understanding of the whole re-staining process, guys please correct me if I'm wrong.

1. clear all the furniture and surface and use broom to clean.
2. spray deck cleaner (I bought this: M-1 1 gal. Deck and Roof Cleaner-DR1G - The Home Depot) and let it sit for like 10-15min, then pressure wash it off.
3. let the deck dry completely for one day and start to apply the stain (bought the SW deck stain with matching color).
4. Apply stain on railings surrounding the deck first, then the surface, lastly the steps. (how long do you think it would take for two guys to do this, about 500 sqft including the steps)

Question is if I want to do two coats, do I wait for the 1st coat to dry completely (how long?) then apply the 2nd coat? My concern is the length of the dry weather. Looks like at least I need 2-3 days of dry days for just one coat.

Thanks a lot.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 03:52 AM
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Sounds like a plan
How long to wait after cleaning depends a lot on weather conditions and where the deck is placed in relationship to the sun and wind. The main thing is to make sure the deck is dry! You don't need nice weather to clean the deck but it you do for the drying and staining process.

It will state on the stain label how long it needs to dry between coats and if there is a recoat window that needs to be adhered to. How long it takes to stain the deck depends a lot on the experience of the person applying the stain. I can stain most decks and railings in less than one day. I'd stain the railing first, then the decking - you almost always want to work from the top down when painting/staining. Rollers will speed things up for you. A 9" roller with a 1/2" or 3/4" nap is good for the decking [looks best if you back brush it] while a small roller works well for a lot of the railing [no back brushing needed] Back brushing is going behind the wet rolled on stain/paint with a brush to remove any roller stipple.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 07:27 AM
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Another dilemma is the weather, it will be sunny for the next couple of days and possible PM rain on Sunday, then next Mon-Wed all said to have chance of PM thunderstorm.

How critical is the dry time after the stain? I understand it's very important to let the deck dry after cleaning before applying stain. I thought my best bet would be try to clean it today or tomorrow and let it dry until Sat, and apply the stain. Hopefully the Sunday PM rain would not be too big a problem? Another less optimal schedule is to wait until Sat morning (not dumping the whole cleaning process to my dad who will help me) when I have time, and let it dry for only 1 day to Sun morning and stain it. Hopefully there would be enough time for it to dry before the PM rain.

BTW, my deck is facing south so plenty of sunshine all day, hopefully it can speed up the drying process?

Also, do you guys normally do the supporting post as well (my deck is 2nd floor, so there are 4-5 supporting beams down there that did not get the sun).
 
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Old 08-25-15, 09:13 AM
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I used to work for a big outfit in fla where the afternoons are prone to scattered showers. We pretty much ignored all but imminent rain and when rain did mess up our paint/stain, we'd deal with it. That can be as simple as just applying another coat to dress it up to taking a water hose and cleaning up the mess It really depends on how dry the stain got before the rain and how hard the rain comes down. If the rain is light enough or the stain dry enough there may be no damage, sometimes the only damage is spotting of the coating and of course the worse case scenario is a down pour right after applying the paint which may wash it off.

Sun and wind always speed up the drying time. Arid temps will dry quicker than high humidity.

I normally stain the posts all the way to the ground. On 2nd story decks I often spray a light coat of stain on the underside - just so it looks nicer BUT there isn't a set of rules you have to abide by, it's mostly customer preference.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 03:23 AM
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so I was able to rub in the M1 cleaner and pressure wash it out afterwards (for the deck surface and railings only, still need to do the steps). A few questions:

1. I followed the instruction to dilute that M1 cleaner, spray on and brushed it. Recommendation is 10-15 min soak, but I waited a little longer, maybe 30-40 min on the areas being applied first because I started to wash it after the whole area was brushed. Hopefully that would not cause any problems.

2. When I power wash it, it took me a couple of sweeps along the deck boards to clean out the cleaners (it turned white after brushing), so I can see the white foamy water still getting squeezed out of the gaps of boards or cracks on the boards after a couple of rounds of "sweeping". I'm not 100% positive that I was able to squeeze every bit of that cleaner out on the deck, but it certainly diluted a lot because I washed it for at least good 30 mins back and forth. Will this left over cleaner (dried out) damage the deck board? Am I supposed to wash it until I see no trace of cleaner (say, only clear water in and out the gaps, cracks). Should I power wash it again if the left over really is a concern?

3. I used 1600psi electric power washer with a 40 degree fan nozzle. I think the real PSI output of water stream was rather low, but I was still constantly worried about damaging the board with the pressured water. So I kinda of "pulsed" use the trigger myself, meaning, I kept the water stream while moving one direction along the board, kinda squeezed out the cleaner(white foamy stuff), and pushed it off one edge of the deck. Then I released the trigger while going back to do another round. This made the pressure washer motor to start and stop (and vibrate), is it bad for the motor? Or should I kept the trigger on all the time no matter what?

4. Should I power wash underneath the deck boards (shooting water up while standing in the ground level)? I'm not planning to stain that part, just not sure if I should wash it now (which might soak the board more and need to dry out longer) or wash it later on after the stain job.

Thanks a lot.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 04:17 AM
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The only issue with leaving the cleaner on too long is if it dries, it's harder to rinse off. I'm not familiar with that cleaner as I always use a bleach/water solution sometimes adding TSP if needed.

You don't need a lot of pressure to clean a deck. As noted too much pressure can damage the wood. While slower, a garden hose is sufficient for the rinsing. I often use an old broom to help clean the stubborn areas. I only use gas pressure washers so I don't know if the stop/start is hard on the unit or not.

IMO if the underside of the deck is visible it should be cleaned.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 06:42 AM
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Thanks, Marksr, for your fast reply.

I inspected the deck just now, and it's not looking as what I expected (from watching those youtube vids), maybe it's because it was covered by solid stain to begin with. The power washer did not blow away all the lose stain strips, so I see a lot attached/semi-attached small paint chips/strips.

questions:
1. I suppose I need to remove those paint chips before applying the 1st coat, what's the best way then? I suppose not power wash it again. Maybe just manually sanding while applying the coat?

2. I bought the stain from SW two months ago, so it's been sitting there for 2mos. What should I do before using it? I heard paint store can treat it for free?

3. Plan to use roller+paint brush. Any recommendations on painting tricks? What should I do to give best results?

4. You mentioned cleaning the flip side of deck surface (it is visible from the walk-out basement). My question is if power wash it again from the ground level, will the deck planks need to be dried even longer since that flip- side does not see sunshine at all,. I only have until maybe Fri afternoon-Sat to start painting.

Much appreciate it.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 07:47 AM
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#1 - hard to say without seeing it. As long as the remaining stain is well adhered it's ok to apply a solid stain over top of it. Sanding might improve the looks.

#2 - It might take a little more stirring or boxing it back and forth in another bucket. Most paint stores will put an unopened can of paint back on the shaker for free.

#3 - I like to use a 3/4" nap [because it holds more paint/stain] and then just brush over it to remove the roller stipple. Keep in mind your arm holding the brush can only reach so far. A small roller works well for the railing [may not need back brushing] Shop WHIZZ Foam Sample and Touch-Up Mini Paint Roller Kit (Common: 2-in; Actual: 2.75-in) at Lowes.com

#4 - Cleaning the underside of the deck will extend the drying time a little but not a lot. It isn't a big deal to clean it now but if you decide after staining the deck that you want to clean it - some of the dirt/grime might make it's way to the new stain.
 
 

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