Restaining Cabinets....sucks


  #1  
Old 07-22-15, 06:54 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Restaining Cabinets....sucks

Well, I'm remodeling my kitchen. Getting new counters, new sink, faucet, backsplash, etc.

I wanted to darken the color of my cabinets as they are a lighter honey oak/golden oak color.

I bought Minwax polyshades and it is not working!

I've degreased, sanded and dusted off the cabinet doors....but the stuff doesn't apply right. Some parts aren't taking at all, other parts get sticky and globbed up. It's not what I expected.

I have resanded and re applied a thinner coat...same thing. Just not working.

I guess these cabinets are builder grade. I've got 5 done so far...and by done, I mean not really done. It looks pretty awful. Most reviews I've seen of the polyshades aren't very good. Guess I should have researched it much more.

Any advice? Will regular stain work better? Should I just paint the stupid things? This is the hardest project I've done.....and I've done a lot harder/more involded renovation projects!
 
  #2  
Old 07-22-15, 07:07 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
Tinted poly can be tricky. Might be best to strip the cabinets and start over with new stain (you won't be able to stain what you have now as stain needs to penetrate the wood surface and yours is sealed).
 
  #3  
Old 07-22-15, 07:10 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Can you better explain the problems you are having applying the polyshades? would it show up in a pic?
Tinted polys must be applied evenly! It can't be touched up and missed spots, runs, lap marks along with heavy/thin areas will all be unsightly. What type of brush are you using?
 
  #4  
Old 07-22-15, 07:10 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
with regular stain?

You have no idea how frustrating it is haha It's so streaky, and I prepped almost too much!
 
  #5  
Old 07-22-15, 07:12 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Tinted polys are extra tricky to apply on bare wood, a regular penetrating oil stain works best on raw wood but in order to use it on previously finished wood - you need to remove all of the existing finish.
 
  #6  
Old 07-22-15, 07:13 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I can get some pictures later. It would show up. It almost like it isn't adhering to certain parts. Like it just won't stick to it. I've degreased, scrubbed, sanded, scrubbed more and sanded more. I do not believe that there is anything to interfere with it. I'm using a Purdy 2.5" brush.

I really think I'm applying it evenly. I go over everything with one last brush stroke to level it out and pick up any left over stain. I've watched videos, looked up the proper way of doing things, etc.
 
  #7  
Old 07-22-15, 07:16 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Does the brush have natural [hog hair] bristles or is it nylon or polyester? Whenever adhesion issues or contaminants are suspected I like to wipe the existing finish down with a liquid deglosser first.
 
  #8  
Old 07-22-15, 07:22 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm not sure, but I was told to buy the Purdy brush. Everyone swears by them.

The polyshade is quite difficult to spread. It seems as if it starts to get tacky right away.

I was thinking that a regular stain would be better. It's what I've always used.
 
  #9  
Old 07-22-15, 07:25 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I was thinking that a regular stain would be better
From your story so far, it sounds like it may be. Just keep in mind that means stripping the existing finish first.

Are these cabinets solid wood, veneer or laminate?
 
  #10  
Old 07-22-15, 07:26 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Regular stain is easier but it takes more prep - removing the existing finish.
I like Purdy brushes but they make a lot of them, not all are best suited for oil base. What does it say on the wrapper/shuck that the brush came in?
 
  #11  
Old 07-22-15, 07:31 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As far as stripping, what do you mean exactly.

I've just been sanding down past the stain/existing poly until it's all bare wood. As well as removing all grease or other contaminants.

The brush is nylon/polyester.

The cabinets as far as I know are wood. Solid, heavy and visually appear to be real as far as wood grain and knots.
 
  #12  
Old 07-22-15, 07:38 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
It is difficult to remove the existing finish by sanding alone. If there is still some finish left, the stain won't take or won't take evenly. IMO the best way to strip wood to restain is to start with a chemical stripper and finish up with sandpaper.

Nylon/polyester blend is great for latex paint but a natural bristle brush [or solvent based paints only] will lay the poly off a lot better. While I almost always use Purdy brushes for latex, I generally use Wooster's Yatchman's brushes for oil base.
 
  #13  
Old 07-22-15, 07:42 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
this could be my issue....I didn't use a chemical stripper.

I just attacked the flat surfaces with an electrical sander, and then went for the curves and smaller parts by hand with sandpaper. Everything appeared to be sanded very evenly.

I don't give up easy, but if I can't figure this out.....I'm going to be a follower and paint them white.
 
  #14  
Old 07-22-15, 07:48 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
As Mark said, you may have the wrong brush for the poly.

At this point, it seems you have little to lose by stripping the cabinets and trying a regular wood stain.
 
  #15  
Old 07-22-15, 07:49 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
The sander should have been fine for using PolyShades. I normally just hand sand with 180 or 220 grit prior to applying a tinted poly. PolyShades is basically a see thru paint and only needs a clean scuffed up surface to be applied to. Regular stain must have bare wood!

You might find this helpful if you decide to paint - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...t-repaint.html
 
  #16  
Old 07-22-15, 08:02 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
do you all think that paint looks "cheesy". Like a cheap kitchen. I've seen it look very modern and clean. But that beautiful dark wood look is just unbeatable.

I found this product, would you still recommend a primer for this product?:

CabinetCoat 1 qt. White Satin Trim and Cabinet Enamel-CC4510 - The Home Depot
 
  #17  
Old 07-22-15, 08:06 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 44
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
seems pricey though.

Is a GOOD brand of paint in satin finish a better idea?

This stuff sounded good because it says it's self leveling and dries quickly.
 
  #18  
Old 07-22-15, 08:11 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I like seeing the grain on quality wood, so I wouldn't paint quality cabinets. Unlike you, I don't like dark wood so I would likely not have changed anything. Ultimately, that matters not at all since these are your cabinets.

Personally, I never buy paint from a paint department, I find paint stores to have better materials and advice.

On a cabinet, I would want a waterborne enamel paint.
 
  #19  
Old 07-22-15, 11:42 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
I wouldn't trust any latex coating to adhere long term over poly without a solvent based primer being used first! I agree with SS about using a waterborne enamel for the finish. Waterborne dries almost as hard as oil base but doesn't yellow like white oil base enamels are prone to. Latex paints give the softest film. The harder the paint film the better the paint will wear/clean.

Personally I prefer stained/poly'd cabinets but because you can go longer between time to recoat. They also don't typically show dirt/grime as easily. That said, if the proper prep is done and quality coatings used - painted cabinets can look nice. Rarely are new cabinets painted. The ones that look painted generally have a laminated material [or other type coating] that gives the painted look.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: