Cleaning cedar siding with Oxygen Bleach


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Old 08-05-15, 11:41 AM
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Cleaning cedar siding with Oxygen Bleach

Ive started this on the side of my house to test whether this is something I can do or not. My entire home is rough cut cedar siding (the overlapping kind). I figured if I could clean and restain it myself, saving 6-7k isn't a bad option!

At first, I thought I would have to restain the same color, but this stuff seems to strip the old stain off. Is that typical? I'm using Wolman DeckBrite Wood Cleaner And Coating Prep, and I also have some Cedar Wash on order to give it a try. On the Wolman label it states for cleaning, but its pretty obvious the stain is being removed. If so, would I be able to move to a water based stain? I'm fairly certain the stain on here now is superdeck transparent oil based.
 
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Old 08-05-15, 12:06 PM
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I normally use regular bleach and add TSP when needed. I don't know a lot about oxygenated bleach other that it's more diy and environmentally friendly.

The only reason for a cleaner to remove the old stain is the fact that the old stain is way past it's prime. The more failing stain you can remove the better!
 
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Old 08-05-15, 01:05 PM
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This side of the home does get a bit more sun than others, so maybe that's why. I guess I should test on a spot that gets no sun, and see how the cleaner works on it. My main concern is whether or not I can use a different color (and water based) using the oxygen cleaner. The wood looks bare to me (see pics), but I'm not all that experienced to know for sure.

I also noticed some fuzzy stuff on the cleaned wood. I'm not sure if this is wood fibers, or the congealed stain or something. I did use a pressure washer but the pressure is very low, and no where near as strong as the stream coming out of some of the videos I've seen (like in this video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKfRRJH4I4E).

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Old 08-05-15, 01:17 PM
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If it all cleans up like the pic shows - you can use whatever stain makes you happy. Most paint manufactures only make latex stains in solid stain although many make a waterborne formula that comes in translucent or toner and semi-transparent. Generally these stains can be applied over a weather oil base stain. The odds are you could go with most any semi-transparent stain no matter how much of the existing stain remains. Translucent or toner stains need to stay close in color unless all the previous stain can be removed.
 
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Old 08-05-15, 01:54 PM
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Excellent, thanks!

I think ill try a light sanding to get this fuzz off. Based on the picture, do you think i need to use a wood brightener?

I guess now that I have the cleaning part down, I just have to pick my stain. Supposedly the water based stains are mildew resistant, which I seem to have a problem with, especially due to my lack of gutters (luckily, doing the staining myself, releases the funds to get gutters!).

Any suggestions are appreciated! I'd like a premium transparent stain that will last hopefully about 8 years. I plan on putting on two coats.
 
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Old 08-05-15, 01:58 PM
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Generally if you pick from one of the major brands and use their best - you can't go wrong. Coatings don't always wear as good in one location as opposed to another so it's always good to get local input as to which coatings wear best. Some of the waterborne stains have a specific recoat window, once that window has passed any more stain applied may or may not adhere as good as it should. It will say on the label. Generally the more transparent the stain is, the shorter it's life span.

I forgot to mention earlier but a good way to tell if you are using too much pressure when washing the siding is if there are grooves or fuzzed wood after you are done cleaning.
 
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Old 08-05-15, 02:05 PM
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I'm not sure about a transparent stain lasting eight years, definitely need to go top of the line to get anywhere close to that.
 
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Old 08-05-15, 03:58 PM
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Being too aggressive with the power washer AND using too much bleach % in the mix will both contribute to the fuzz. Kind of unavoidable though, if you want to get the old off, you are basically blasting fibers of wood off.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 03:18 AM
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I know too strong of a bleach solution can fuzz up the wood by destroying the wood fibers I always use bleach but never mix it stronger than 50/50 [water/bleach] I never use the oxygenated bleach - will it also destroy wood fibers? I thought it was supposed to be dummy proof ??
 
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Old 08-06-15, 06:31 AM
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It must be the solution, because I tried it on a pine log with the same stain, and only used a brush and hose to rinse, same fuzz. I suppose it isn't too bad since the stuff really does a good and easy job of removing the old stain, plus I can spray it and not have to worry about it getting on the grass and what not. I'm doing the side of the house as a test and will go over it with some light sanding, so as long as that isn't too labor intensive to remove the fuzz, I think its worth it.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 06:52 AM
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A drywall pole sander works well for knocking down the fuzz.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 12:42 PM
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Thanks for that tip! I have one sitting idle in the garage too.... didn't think i ever would use it again
 
 

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