Painting Linoleum


  #1  
Old 04-04-01, 09:12 AM
Guest
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Question

I have a 50 year old linoleum floor in my kitchen that I don't have the resources to replace. I know that I've seen instructions on how to paint & seal it to give it a face lift but don't remember what products to use.

Any help would be terrific!
 
  #2  
Old 04-04-01, 11:25 AM
mikejmerritt
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Cindon, Opinions differ on how to prime a linoleum floor but what we all agree on is no warranty comes with this advice. When called on to do this I clean with TSP, let dry and prime with Zinsser 123. I would let this primer dry 5-6 days if possible but is not a must. You could recoat the next day if needed. Follow with a good floor enamel which does come in some nice colors these days. The difference in advice you will get is in what to use as primer. Some will say oil(like KILZ Original) but after a few jobs I think the latex primer bonds better....Mike
 
  #3  
Old 04-05-01, 09:18 PM
Sonnie Layne
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I agree with Mike. 1-2-3 is a fine product, sticks to anything it seems. Like Kilz however, I only use it where needed. This would likely be one of those places. Kilz won't work. There are some other primers that may. Check with your paint stores (not the big orange barn), many manufacturers now have primers that are purportedly as "sticky", but 123 was the first that I know of.

I would further recommend that you finish coat with an acrylic latex floor paint, rather than the alkyd (oil based) ones for elasticity and vapor transmissivity. Let it cure well before traffic. How long? As long as you can stand. A week would be nice.
 
  #4  
Old 04-05-01, 09:23 PM
Sonnie Layne
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I agree with Mike. 1-2-3 is a fine product, sticks to anything it seems. Like Kilz however, I only use it where needed. This would likely be one of those places. Kilz won't work. There are some other primers that may. Check with your paint stores (not the big orange barn), many manufacturers now have primers that are purportedly as "sticky", but 123 was the first that I know of.

I would further recommend that you finish coat with an acrylic latex floor paint, rather than the alkyd (oil based) ones for elasticity and vapor transmissivity. Let it cure well before traffic. How long? As long as you can stand. A week would be nice.

There's no doubt that if the floor is linoleum, you'll have pitted and otherwise damaged areas. I'm thinking you could use a latex-modified thinset mortar to skim those areas. Clean the area thoroughly before using. It's also very "sticky", I've laid ceramic/stone over vinyl with the stuff.

Good luck,

Sonnie
http://www.sonnielayne.com
 
  #5  
Old 04-06-01, 07:15 PM
JDX
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Mike, do you think a oil enamel would hold up better than latex? Sometimes latex seems to peel off in cases like this. Also Mike, what do you think about using the alkyd primer/ latex enamel combo? Mike, I know you have the wisdom and knowledge to lead us in the right direction. Teach us little grass-hoppers how it's done.
 
  #6  
Old 04-07-01, 04:05 AM
mikejmerritt
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Grasshopper, I feel that the 100% acrylic latex primer has greater bonding properties than oil on surfaces that cannot be penetrated like raw wood. Beware that all of the these latex primers are not created equal. Sherwin-Willaims has two of these(Preprite Classic and Preprite 200) they swear are as good as any but the first clue they are not is that they are only to be used inside. Go figure. The only two I will use are Richards Holzout II(the best) and Zinsser 123. The Richards is int./ext. and after a curing time will bond to anything including glass. As for the oil/latex floor finish, the latex floor material has come a long way and in this case agree with Sonnie about the "elasticity and vapor transmissivity" factor. These floors are not stable and the latex will give a lttle without breaking up in time. On concrete floors I still use oil floor enamel unless its inside and fumes are a problem. I am of the opinion that a good oil will hold up to traffic on concrete better that the latex. Now, Grasshoppers, go into the world with your new found knowledge...LOL...Mike
 
  #7  
Old 04-07-01, 03:11 PM
mikejmerritt
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Hey JDX, After reading back through this thead I'm curious if you meant with your question "Mike, what do you think about using the alkyd primer/ latex enamel combo?" are you refering to everyday raw wood trim finish? If so I have thoughts on the subject but lets start a new thread...Get back here if so and we'll do it!.....Mike
 
 

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