Should I paint my kitchen cabinets?


  #1  
Old 10-08-15, 06:23 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 138
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Should I paint my kitchen cabinets?

I am renovating my kitchen and my cabinets looks very old. They are in great condition, so I thought a nice fresh coat of paint would do wonders. I am thinking I want to paint them white as it seems very modern and that style will never really go out of fashion. Though I know how much work it will take to do it, which I am fine with, but what do you all think?

Would white looks best, an expresso, or leave them be?

 
  #2  
Old 10-08-15, 06:37 AM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,265
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I vote to leave them as they are. If anything, there maybe something to help restore it, to the original look.
 
  #3  
Old 10-08-15, 06:59 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 138
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
That is the original look. That same stain is basically throughout the house (or was). It is on all of the bedroom doors and trim. All of which I painted white. I will take another pic here soon to show some day light on them. They are lighter than this picture shows.
 
  #4  
Old 10-08-15, 07:16 AM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,265
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Another pic isn't needed. I like the cabinets the way they are. I wish you had asked about the bedroom doors & trim. My parents had a house & the same thing was done, on the interior doors. I thought that it was a big mistake.
 
  #5  
Old 10-08-15, 08:58 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,228
Received 754 Upvotes on 659 Posts
I also like the knotty pine. The biggest mistake folks make when painting over stained/poly'd wood is lack or proper prep. It needs to be sanded lightly and then coated with a solvent based primer to insure adhesion. The top coat can be latex, oil base or waterborne enamel. While oil base dries to the hardest film [=longest wear] it yellows as it ages. Waterborne [my favorite] dries almost as hard as oil but doesn't yellow.

If you paint your cabinets you'd need to replace the hardware to make it look right. One of the downsides of painting is it will show wear sooner than poly and will need a fresh coat of paint at some point.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...t-repaint.html
 
  #6  
Old 10-08-15, 09:22 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 138
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the information!

I've researched this quite a bit on here and through google searches and it definitely is a lot more work than I initially thought. I'm fine with doing the work as I will be couped up all winter.

What if I restained it an expresso color, would that require the same prep? As I keep looking at expresso cabinets, it is making this decision harder for me.

I have lived in my home since I was seven and the cabinet color is getting old to me. I am thinking about renting or selling the home within the next couple of years, so that is the reasoning I am wanting a modern look, to draw people in.
 
  #7  
Old 10-08-15, 09:33 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,228
Received 754 Upvotes on 659 Posts
Personally I prefer the old look over a lot of the new modern stuff ..... but then maybe I'm just old

To stain the cabinets you'd need to completely strip off the existing finish. This is best accomplished with a chemical stripper followed by sanding. Another option would be to apply a tinted poly like Minwax's PolyShades over the existing [lightly sanded] finish. Tinted polys can be a little tricky to apply! It's kind of like a see thru paint. Any drips, runs or lapmarks will have more color and look unsightly. Thin or missed spots will have less. It isn't a coating that lends itself to touch up.
 
  #8  
Old 10-08-15, 12:16 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 138
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I've used this chemical stripper before that worked very well. I forget the name of it, I just remember it looked like pink ooze.

Does anyone have a product they recommend? Then should I do a smooth sand with a 400 gritt or so sandpaper?
 
  #9  
Old 10-08-15, 01:53 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,228
Received 754 Upvotes on 659 Posts
I don't strip very often so whenever that type of job comes up I rely on the rep at the paint store to recommend the best one for the job at hand.

There is never any need to use 400 grit on wood! In fact using too fine of a grit will close up the pores of the wood making it harder to accept stain. 120 or 150 grit is fine enough prior to applying the stain. It is important to sand with the direction of the grain to prevent cross grain scratches that are sometimes difficult to remove. I'll generally use 150 or 180 grit on the 1st coat of poly and 220 on the final coat.
 
  #10  
Old 10-08-15, 05:38 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,265
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
pfar54, I think that doing all that work is insane. There is no benefit at all.
 
  #11  
Old 10-09-15, 07:29 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,893
Received 1,197 Upvotes on 1,152 Posts
I don't like painted wood but it's your house and Mark gave you the link which provides the info you need if you want to paint. Keep in mind, it will be a bigger job than you think it is and using a darker color paint will not save any effort.

My 2 is the same as Pulpo - I wouldn't do it.
 
  #12  
Old 10-09-15, 02:38 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,265
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
My 2 is the same as Pulpo - I wouldn't do it.
We're up to 4 cents. I rest my case.
 
  #13  
Old 10-10-15, 03:48 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,228
Received 754 Upvotes on 659 Posts
Lets make it a nickel

While I wouldn't paint them if it was my house [maybe a fresh coat of poly] and while I'd question the customer to make sure that is what they want, if they were willing to pay me - I'd prime and paint them
 
  #14  
Old 10-12-15, 06:54 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 138
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I appreciate all of the advise. I'm not quite sure what I want to do yet. I think choosing back splashes will help the case of what I want to do.

Thanks!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: