Sherwin Williams exterior paint choice, Florida

Reply

  #41  
Old 12-10-15, 02:08 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
While I've not used that particular product, I've used similar and it should be ok over the faded aluminum [thin coat is plenty on aluminum] The new aluminum has no need for the binder.
 
Sponsored Links
  #42  
Old 12-10-15, 02:18 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Thanks for the quick response, greatly appreciated. Jim
 
  #43  
Old 12-10-15, 03:30 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
After I posted I had a thought. This is a chalk bonder specially formulated to bond to chalk. The chalk is old paint, so what difference would it make if it was on stucco, aluminum or wood? Color me confused Jim
 
  #44  
Old 12-11-15, 03:24 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
Some coatings are formulated for specific substrates. Generally a cheaper coating will work on masonry but not preform as well on wood. All the oil base binders I've ever used were for masonry only [according to the label] although I've sprayed light coats of it over wood with no issues. EmulsaBond is a higher priced product and is formulated for use on both wood and masonry.

Not being a chemist I can't say for sure but I think the binder cuts thru the chalk chemically making it [and the binder] adhere to the underlying substrate.
 
  #45  
Old 12-11-15, 05:13 AM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Again thanks for the response. This H&C shows styrene acrylic resin's if that makes any difference?

In going through this I did not think the peak over the garage is T111 so I have aluminum, stucco and wood!

I should be like my neighbor, he went to HD bought some self priming Behr paint, pressure washed and then painted his house. Never asked a question!
Jim
 
  #46  
Old 12-11-15, 01:15 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I got to thinking about this and think I will be a bit short on the bonder and not 100% sure it is the right product for the wood and aluminum. So I ran over to Scotts paint and picked up a gallon of Emulsa Bond for the wood and aluminum!

I give the guy in the store my best smile and asked for the student discount and he knocked $8 off the retail $38 price!
Jim
 
  #47  
Old 12-11-15, 02:27 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
Wow, I didn't know they raised the price that high ..... but then I don't normally pay retail

It's been awhile since I read an EB label but I don't remember ever using it straight out of the jug. I've always mixed it with the first coat of latex [primer or paint] 25% EB - 75% paint generally works well although I have mixed it 50/50 before if the chalk was severe.


I tried to get a discount based on my looks once - I think they charged me double
 
  #48  
Old 12-11-15, 07:50 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Poopies! "Do not use in first coat of gloss paint" Now guess who bought gloss paint for the trim?
Jim
 
  #49  
Old 12-12-15, 05:22 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
I've read that also and not sure why the label says that as I've used it with satin and semi-gloss on multiple occasions with no issues [mostly spraying aluminum siding] I suspect they are concerned that it might affect the looks of the finish if it isn't mixed in with the paint well. It's more important to only use EB with the first coat of paint. IF there are any sheen issues with the 1st coat, a 2nd coat without EB should correct it.
 
  #50  
Old 12-12-15, 03:14 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Now that I think about this, I am wondering why I bought gloss for the trim? I looked around the neighborhood and I don't see any house that looks like it has gloss trim.

So now I have 2 gal of SW exterior gloss Super Paint I do not want to use. I have been reading on the internet about mixing different sheen's together with no issue.

Any 2nd opinions on mixing say a gallon of Gloss with a gallon of flat in the same SW Super Paint in the same color? This is a deep base Swing Brown 6046 if that makes any difference.

Is there a formula for reducing from gloss to say satin? Jim
 
  #51  
Old 12-13-15, 04:35 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
As long as both paints are latex you can mix them together. Even though I've mixed various paints together many times over the years I don't really know any formula for adjusting the sheen. Flat paint does seem to be dominate as equal amounts of flat and gloss seem to produce a sheen that isn't in the middle. Since you already have 2 gallons of gloss [and presumably won't need more paint] I'd still mix 1 gallon of flat to both gallons. That should insure you'll have enough paint. Be sure to mix it well!
 
  #52  
Old 12-13-15, 04:49 AM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Thanks Mark, I must owe you a consultation fee by now! Jim
 
  #53  
Old 12-13-15, 04:54 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
For anyone that is interested on changing the sheen. I stopped by the SW store today and asked if there was a formula for changing sheen. Both clerks said no and I am on my own if I want to try.

So I poked around the net a bit and found this. I will buy some flat and experiment with it.Name:  aasheen.jpg
Views: 492
Size:  19.8 KB

I read it on the internet, it must be true Jim
 
  #54  
Old 12-14-15, 03:58 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
That sounds about right. Not sure I'd bother with a mixer on a drill. The only time I ever use one is when mixing roof paint. I'd take 2 five gallon buckets and pour the three gallons of paint in one and then box it back and forth between the two buckets repeatedly. IMO that is easier and just as effective as using a paint paddle on a drill.
 
  #55  
Old 12-14-15, 06:08 AM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
What the?? I went to SW and picked up a can of SW Super Paint in the same color in flat. I get home and set the can down and it says right on the can paint and primer in one! The other 2 cans do not say it.

Can I still mix this together?

Name:  paint.jpg
Views: 581
Size:  39.0 KB
 
  #56  
Old 12-14-15, 07:35 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
IMO primer/paint in one is just a marketing ploy! While a separate dedicated primer is always best, you can get by without a primer over minor raw areas with flat paint. You can't do that with a gloss because it will result in a sheen difference.

But to answer your question you can intermix the 2 paints as they are both latex ..... just be sure to mix them well so the sheen will be constant thru your entire batch of paint.
 
  #57  
Old 12-14-15, 03:27 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
After I posted I had a thought, why not call SW, well duh! The clerk assured me it is the exact same paint, only the label has changed!!

On the SW website the picture of can show paint and primer in one. When I was researching this I am almost sure that it did not say paint and primer in one on website just a few weeks ago??

Mixed 1/2 gal flat to 1 gal gloss and added 1 qt EB, mixed it up real good with drill. Looks ok. I am not sure what to call the sheen, it's not flat, it's not gloss?

Super Paint, flashes a bit too fast for an old guy, goes on nice but I do not see it covering in one coat unless sprayed. The one thing I did notice is the brushes and roller cleaned up quickly.
Jim
 
  #58  
Old 12-14-15, 03:38 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
Labels are constantly changing but they don't usually change the formula. When they do that, they usually change the name on the label.

I've been partial to the exterior SuperPaint line since they came out with.

Without seeing it, I'd guess the sheen you came up with is a little shinier than satin.
 
  #59  
Old 12-14-15, 06:43 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Any ideas on how to keep the paint from plugging the holes in the perforated aluminum soffit?
Jim
 
  #60  
Old 12-15-15, 03:49 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
You'll have to apply thin coats in order to keep the vents open.
 
  #61  
Old 12-15-15, 04:27 AM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Hey Mark, thanks for the response. I may be describing the holes wrong? They are not holes they are indentations, about 1/2" long and 1/8" deep and 1/8" wide where the opening is on each side. Many of these are already block from the first time they were painted.

I have spent an hour poking around the net and see no solution? Jim
 
  #62  
Old 12-15-15, 04:38 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
I understand what you have, I painted in fla for many years and an aluminum perforated soffit was fairly common. I prefer to spray them but I know that isn't always an option. Applying a thin coat of paint lessens the chance of plugging up the holes/slits. The ones that are already partially plugged will be the hardest ones to keep open.

Maybe an hour spent poking the holes in the soffit would have been time better spent
 
  #63  
Old 12-15-15, 06:45 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
An hour poking holes, there are 20 billion of them!:NO NO NO:

I tried putting paint on thin today, I'm not a good painter so not happy with results. I did go up in attic and noticed there is a lot of light coming up through soffits, so may not be as bad as I think?? I asked some one at Home Depot and he said the only way to get paint thin enough is to spray.

Also read about venting, soffits may be waaaay to much air flow to start with so some blockage is acceptable. I have continuous perforated soffit that is 2' wide, feeding a ridge vent.

I am going to pick up a filter for my compressor tomorrow and try blowing on the openings as I paint??
Jim
 
  #64  
Old 12-16-15, 02:40 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
What went wrong with applying a thin coat? You might not get full coverage with a thin coat but coming back and applying another thin coat will fix that.

While blowing any dust out of the vents doesn't hurt, I doubt adding air to paint right after it's applied will help - let us know how it goes.
 
  #65  
Old 12-17-15, 01:10 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Blowing air in is not working out. Have to let the paint dry a bit, then blow air in and can see vents opening. But too soon and blows paint around, have to re roll too late and the paint peel's off. So have about 3 hours in 20 foot of soffit!

I looked at other perforated aluminum soffits that have been painted and the holes are plugged! I think at this point painting and trying to keep holes open is a waste of time and effort. Must be a better way.
 
  #66  
Old 12-17-15, 02:29 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
While you might not need all the ventilation provided by the continuous soffit - attic ventilation is important, probably more so in fla than elsewhere. It pays to do the best you can to keep the slits open. I'm not a fan of over brushing paint but that might help you to keep the vents open.
 
  #67  
Old 12-17-15, 04:06 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Thanks for the response. Trying to keep the vents open is difficult and time consuming. I'm retired and not in any hurry but have no desire to waste my time either.

The coat of paint applied before I owned the house has blocked much of the vent and me adding 2 coats will only make it much worse. So I am just going to paint it and see what it looks like when I get done. I believe I can add some soffit vent's with much less effort than painting.

Knowing what I know now I would try spraying the soffits, I suspect it would work better?
Jim
 
  #68  
Old 12-18-15, 04:43 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
I like spraying aluminum soffits both because it's quicker and you can get good coverage with a thinner coat making it hard to plug the vents BUT a lot goes into whether or not spraying is a good option. Mainly be conscious of where the overspray might go, it can travel a long ways in the wind.
 
  #69  
Old 12-18-15, 09:05 AM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I have not used a big airless sprayer since I was in my twenty's, that is like 4 decades ago, so I do not remember much.

A long ways is rather subjective, There is about 25' between my house and the neighbors. Would that be safe on a calm day?

Thanks for the response alsays appreciated. Jim
 
  #70  
Old 12-18-15, 10:13 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
I've seen overspray drift 25' or more and land/dry on objects you don't want it to. Not having any wind helps! How you handle the spray gun can go along ways in determining how much overspray there will be. Not getting overspray on others property is the number one concern but you also want to be mindful of your windows and not having any wrap around and land on the roof.
 
  #71  
Old 12-28-15, 05:17 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Update.

If I was starting this and knew what I know now I would spray the soffit, painfully slow doing it by hand. Now I would have to buy or rent a sprayer, learn how to use it and then spray, so might as well finish by hand. I don't like to thin paint but added 2 oz of water to the first coat of paint, to make my life a bit eaiser!

Changed back to gloss SW paint for the soffits, the Super Paint gloss is not that glossy and will hold up better to the Fl elements (I hope).

Had the H&G bonder tinted a bit, too difficult to see going over white.

I thought the Super Paint cleaned out of the brushes easily. I had bought some bushes at a close out/thrift store for a couple bucks apiece. I noticed that the bushes put on paint extremely well and looked them up on the net. They are Wooster pro brushes! I had never heard of them. Well worth what they cost even at full retail!

I decided on 1 side a week for this job and am now only about 2 weeks behind, that and no one showed up for my paint party. Jim
 
  #72  
Old 12-29-15, 08:09 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
I lost the invitation

While Purdy is my favorite brand for brushes, Wooster makes good ones also. You worried me when you said you bought the brushes at a discount store until you mentioned the brand Even with all my painting experience it would be difficult for me to do a good job with a cheap brush.
 
  #73  
Old 01-05-16, 07:00 PM
jjrbus's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: US
Posts: 322
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I wanted a cheap brush for jamming paint into rough stucco areas. Not cutting and such.

Using a 1 1/4" roller cover but I think a mop would work best for applying paint on this stucco.

I picked up another 5 gallon bucket of super paint, this one says paint and primer the old one does not!

Other people said dog must have ate their invitation! Jim
 
  #74  
Old 01-06-16, 03:18 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,047
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
With rough stucco it is usually best to really load the paint up and let it run into all the cracks/crevices and then reroll it with a not so wet roller to pick up the excess paint and eliminate any runs.

Ya, we'll blame it on the dog
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: