Do you scrape more than just the peeling exterior paint?

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Old 11-15-15, 04:57 PM
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Do you scrape more than just the peeling exterior paint?

I did some googling but admittingly not much and will do some more, but decided to make this thread because I was surprised what I read.
People are mostly suggesting to scrape more than just the peeling paint only if you're concerned with adhesion to the existing (not peeling) paint.

I'm not concerned with it not peeling as long as it's clean and not a glossy finish (in which case I would sand it first lightly just to rough up the surface). A quick sanding of glossy surfaces is easy. I think modern paint should stick well and cans usually don't say it has to be down to bare wood to stick (might say it needs primer but a lot have primer included). I know you should always scrape off the peeling stuff. Some cans say if you just paint over it, it is more likely to peel worse. Scraping very loose chipping paint is pretty easy. I find the easiest tool to use is this
Allway Tools 2-1/2 in. Wood Scraper-F4HD - The Home Depot

If you're doing a whole house, they probably make wide ones of that ^ that attach to a pole.

Anyway, I was surprised I wasn't reading about how people would suggest to scrape off everything to avoid having very obvious blotches/patches when you just scape what's loose and paint over it. When you just scape what comes off easily, you end up with a recessed area. The more previous layers of paint, the more obvious the recessed area. I just did a section of my wood soffit like this and it came out pretty bad but it's high up enough that no one would know.

I just refurbished an older front door that had paneled glass with trim and glazed side windows. First, I scraped off what was really loose. IT had about 6 layers of paint already. My original plan was to just scrape the loose and paint but I did my soffit a few days earlier and realized what it would look like. It's probably more work to try and go back every day after it dries and paint the recessed areas but not the thicker areas and try and build them up to the same plane.
I ended up getting a paint stripper even though I didn't want to use chemicals. I got the strongest stripper they sell at home depot and it did a terrible job. It's supposed to do multiple layers. I had to reapply it maybe 10 times plus I started using a heat gun which well out performed the stripper but is still very tedious and time consuming. I got it all down to the bare wood for the most part and then cleaned the stripper residue with mineral spirits and am letting it dry before it's painted. There are still some areas that have paint but it's such a thin layer that it should cause the recessed/patches I am talking about. if it does, then a second coat should fix it.
 
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Old 11-15-15, 05:01 PM
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I have tried a grinding wheel made for stripping paint in the past. It just gunks up in 2 seconds and becomes smooth and does nothing.
I googled on my phone while seeing how bad the stripper was working and read a bunch of discussions about how they banned a certain chemical from strippers around 2010 and thus are less effective now.
 
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Old 11-15-15, 05:13 PM
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I think they call it 'craters'. This is exactly what I'm talking about and I was considering a skim coat of exterior grade compound to just go over the whole thing and make a new flat surface but this is not possible when you have curved or detailed mouldings.

Step 2: Scraping Loose Paint

The main issue some people have with scraping is that it results in a “cratered” effect on the surface wherever the peeling paint stopped peeling and started adhering. This is especially noticeable on smooth, lapboard-wood siding. If you use a low-luster paint, it’s hard to see these depressions from the sidewalk, but if you get up close you can see them and it bothers some people. If you are one of those people it bothers, you have two choices: Hire a contractor to completely remove all the old paint, or use a “siding spackle” to fill the craters and then sand them smooth.

The first option—complete paint removal—isn’t really something you can do yourself. The various methods—chemical stripping, sandblasting, belt-sanding, or combinations thereof—are nasty, brutish, and never short. If you want to go that route, hire a contractor who specializes in restorations. Using siding spackle, on the other hand, is something you can do yourself if those craters are really going to keep you awake at night. Ask at the paint store for an exterior-grade filler that dries hard and is meant to withstand the elements. Purchase a variety of putty knives to apply the filler to the siding (2-inch, 4-inch, and 6-inch should cover it). Fill in the craters with smooth swipes of the knife, trying not to goop on too much spackle because that’s just more you’ll have to sand off—but at the same time realize the spackle will usually shrink a little when it dries so you need to account for that.

After it’s dry (give it at least 24 hours since most good exterior-grade spackle is oil-based), start sanding it with an orbital or vibrating palm-sander and sixty- or eighty-grit sandpaper. Wear a dust mask. The radio won’t help you here because you won’t be able to hear it over the sander, so get ready for some serious tedium.

I’ve seen people practically reconstruct a whole side of a house using this method, and it looks okay if it’s done properly, but it is time-consuming and labor-intensive. As such, if you choose this method of cosmetic repair (and keep in mind that’s all it is), my advice is to focus on highly visible areas, i.e. the front side of the house and around commonly used doorways. If you find yourself spackling the back side of the garage, please consult a licensed therapist to help you deal with your neuroses
 
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Old 11-15-15, 05:17 PM
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even this is just making craters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1RIyVcwdtI

belt sander just gunks up $7 belts in two seconds also like this has for me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvaewt92OBQ
 
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Old 11-15-15, 05:50 PM
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Spackle is a registered trade mark of the Muralo Company. Unfortunately, just like Bayer didn't aggressively fight others using the word aspirin, spackle (small S) has been accepted into common usage as any kind of smoothing compound used prior to painting.

Years ago there was a product called "spackling paste" and it was a relatively thin putty-like material that was applied with a putty knife to even out dips and dings in surfaces prior to painting. I don't know if you had to let it "set up" for a period of time before painting (I'm not a painter but my daddy was) but I suspect so. What products exist today for the same purpose I do not know.

belt sander just gunks up $7 belts in two seconds also like this has for me
That happens when sanding latex paint. Although latex paint has many good qualities it is not easy to refinish.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spackling_paste
 
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Old 11-16-15, 03:35 AM
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IMO it is rarely a good idea to spackle the low spots on an exterior repaint. Those areas are apt to be the first to fail Most will opt to just scrape and leave the rest. Sometimes I'll sand the edges to minimize the difference between the missing and still adhered paint but most folks don't want to pay the extra charge. Spackling is easier but I'll only do it with a disclaimer. When spackling outside it's important to use an exterior spackle! as it will hold up better than the interior type. It's always a good idea to coat the spackling with an oil base primer to further seal it from the moisture.

As Furd noted, sanding latex paint will plug up the sandpaper in short order. Sanding heats up the paint and latex becomes gummy.
 
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