paint blisters

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  #1  
Old 12-17-15, 07:15 AM
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paint blisters

I have co-worker who moved into a home this summer. ~1950 bungalow, empty, recently painted inside. Now months later he's starting to see small blisters appear in the paint on his kitchen walls--on both interior and exterior walls. There is no water in the blisters when pricked, no leaks and no known humidity problems.

Anyone seen this occur before? Odd to me that it's taken months to appear.
 
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Old 12-17-15, 07:24 AM
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Most common cause for blisters is a moisture issue.
Is it only happening in the kitchen?
If so I wonder if they took the time to degrease the walls before painting.
If there was some patching done they may not have taken the time to wipe down the walls to get the drywall compound dust off the walls.
 
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Old 12-17-15, 10:06 AM
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Besides being painted over a contaminant it's possible the walls were previously painted with oil base enamel. Latex paint doesn't adhere well over oil base enamel. You should be able to scrape one or two of the blisters to find the cause.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html
 
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Old 12-17-15, 11:35 AM
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What should I tell him to look for or test for, since you can't see contamination?
Any time I've read of similar complaints, it showed up immediately. I should restate these are small blisters. Smaller than a dime.

He's not a happy camper right now. All settled in and facing the possibility of stripping all the paint of the walls (MANY coats).
 
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Old 12-17-15, 02:35 PM
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No need to strip all the layers of paint but it might be prudent to strip it down to sound paint. Generally I'll just scrape/sand to remove what readily comes off, prep as needed and pray for the best.

If it's a contaminant you can usually feel it on the back of the peeled paint. The test for oil base paint can be done once the peeling paint is scraped out of the way.
 
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Old 12-18-15, 08:16 AM
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Generally I'll just scrape/sand to remove what readily comes off, prep as needed and pray for the best.
I told him about an old adhesion trick where you apply a piece of tape (literally a Band-Aid--I think for consistancy) and peel it off. If paint comes with it--it's not adhered, if it stays put--it's fine. He tried it and nothing came off with the tape. The blisters are too small to release.

So does this sound like he just needs to scrape off the bumps, spackle/prime/paint?

You've seen these small blisters before? Do you think it's "done" (after living there 4 months) and it's OK to fix it now rather than wait even longer?
 
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Old 12-18-15, 08:51 AM
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I've seen a lot of different blisters [they aren't all the same] but the 2 main causes are contaminants [including painting over unprepped oil enamel] and moisture.

It's really hard to say if it will be an ongoing issue. Nobody ever calls me and ask for me to fix it later - they want it done now! All I could do was to remove what I could, make the repairs as needed and include a disclaimer about the areas I wasn't able to remove. Waiting longer might be safer ..... but does he want to live with the mess in the meantime [most don't]
 
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