Please Help - Painted wall with wrong roller - Now what?

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Old 01-13-16, 09:53 AM
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Please Help - Painted wall with wrong roller - Now what?

OK here's my issue.....

I patched a hole in an existing interior drywall wall what is about 12x10'.
I repainted part of the entire wall (about a 3' wide section) from ceiling to floor using the same paint (latex) and I guess I used the wrong roller because the newly painted section looks like a different texture than the untouched part next to it. The old part looks a lot smoother and the newly painted part looks rough and bumpy. So what now? Can I just get the correct roller and paint right over it? Do I need to sand it first? Do I need to cover it with primer first?

A secondary issue is that since I only paointed about 1/3 of the entire corner-to corner wall, you can see a line where the old paint end and the new paint begins. So I think I need to repaint the entire wall corner to corner. So do I just use paint on top of paint or do I now use primer over the entire wall first and then repaint, using the correct roller? Thanks in advance. I really need some help here!
 
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Old 01-13-16, 10:30 AM
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As long as you're painting the whole wall (which happens, some paints just don't touch up well), you could use the same roller or get one with a shorter nap.
 
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Old 01-13-16, 11:35 AM
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Do I need to sand down the wall first or just paint over it with a shorter nap roller?
 
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Old 01-13-16, 12:03 PM
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Hard to say without seeing it. The thicker the paint, the more apt it is to fill in the texture. Sanding never hurts between coats!
 
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Old 01-13-16, 12:53 PM
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I know you normally wouldn't use a primer to paint over paint of the same color, but wouldn't a primer layer first help to make the final paint look smoother?
 
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Old 01-13-16, 01:01 PM
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Your lack of smoothness came from a roller with too much nap, IMO. Applying anything with that same roller will not resolve/help the issue. That said, if you're going to go through more effort than just applying another coat of paint, I would lightly sand the wall instead.
 
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Old 01-13-16, 01:35 PM
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What size nap did you use? Is it a slick finished wall or does it have some texture? Is it something that would show up in a pic? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

before I forget again welcome to the forums Jack!
 
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Old 01-13-16, 01:55 PM
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I patched a hole in an existing interior wall
How big was the patch? You painted 3' wide, floor to ceiling.
I'm thinking it might be drywall dust that created the texture. From my experience, it's hard to achieve a textured look with a roller alone even if you tried.
 
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Old 01-14-16, 12:10 PM
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it was a 3/8 nap, which is supposed to be average for a normal interior wall, so I don't know why it looks not smooth??? Maybe my roller technique isn't great? The wall didn't appear to have any texture and next to it on the same wall it's smooth.
 
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Old 01-14-16, 12:13 PM
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The patch was 8" x 8" but the compound over that made the area larger...like 2'x2'.
I smoothed down the compound, sanded it and then painted it with primer and then
sanded again and then painted. But the entire wall looks not smooth...not just aver the area
that was patched. I did wipe it down with a rag before painting, so I don't think it was drywall dust?
 
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Old 01-14-16, 12:37 PM
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I still think it was the roller but maybe more now that you were re-rolling the paint too long rather than the nap was too long. Don't keep going over the same area as the roller tends to leave more stipple as the paint starts to dry.
 
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Old 01-14-16, 12:54 PM
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I did wipe it down with a rag before painting, so I don't think it was drywall dust
I was probably wrong about the dust. As you and StickShift said, maybe technique.
I usually start with an M shape, then fill it in, rolling vertically. You only want to overlap wet areas a little. If you start rolling over areas that are not wet enough, you will get problems.
 
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Old 01-14-16, 01:28 PM
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If the original walls were sprayed and not back rolled they would have a completely different texture than a wall where a roller was used. I would use the same roller but this time paint that whole wall and not part of it. Partial wall painting rarely goes as good as planned, especially if there is a sheen on the wall.
 
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Old 01-14-16, 01:40 PM
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IF the walls were originally sprayed - they should have been back rolled ..... but maybe they weren't.
Stickshift's idea that the paint was over rolled is a plausible cause. If the paint is rerolled after the paint starts to set it will pull some of the paint off of the wall resulting in a rough finish.

I rarely ever use the M or W technique when rolling paint. While that was beneficial back when we painted walls with oil base paint it is seldom of much benefit with latex paints. I take a loaded roller and make a full swipe, repeat and with the now drier roller - reroll the first swipe to even it out. I rarely use a 3/8" nap on walls, I prefer 1/2"

I'd suggest sanding the wall and applying another coat of paint using a good technique [no dry rolling]
 
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Old 01-14-16, 01:53 PM
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Just a point of clarification, if this is simply an eggshell paint on the wall, all the sanding and re-applying will not prevent it from flashing and showing the newly painted area. Painting the whole wall is the best way to blend. And to Marksr's comment about technique, always finish your final stroke in the same direction - for example, always finish each row with a down stroke.
 
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Old 01-15-16, 01:09 PM
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To add to this....

Sand the whole wall with a pole sander, not a sanding block...

Recut, and reroll the entire wall, and throw out that 3/8" nap roller, their useless.

Go to Home Depot, and when your standing in front of all the rollers, the roller you want is on the top left, called a hanstek. Their a bit more expensive but worth every penny. Vget yourself a nice 1/2" (for walls) and a 3/4" (for ceilings) $10 and $12 respectively thats each!

Cheap rollers, like the ones found in the value packs, buy a paint tray roller handle and brush for $6 are complete garbage.

Your other option is to head over to a local sherwin williams store and pick up a couple Purdy Collassal roller covers, their blue and white...

Roll the whole wall.

When your done, wash out the roller with warm water and spin it out in the sink, then hang it somewhere and let it dry...
 
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Old 01-15-16, 02:04 PM
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I had to look up the 'hanstek' roller cover - never heard of one before. I do like lambswool covers and given a choice that's about the only type I'll use because they disperse the paint better with less roller spray than synthetic covers ..... but most aren't willing to pay the extra and while the cover can last a long time it doesn't handle abuse well [dry rolling, applying too much pressure] I do agree the bargain basement brushes and rollers/covers are garbage!
 
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Old 01-18-16, 02:11 PM
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I think thats what happened
 
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Old 01-18-16, 02:18 PM
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crap...I DID use one of the "value pack" rollers, stupidly thinking they were all the same

so I have decided to repaint the entire wall this time, with the proper roller and using the proper rolling technique. I have learned a lot from Youtube AFTER I already messed up the wall
My question though now is on the nap size for the roller....isn't the 1/2" size bigger than the 3/8"? And doesn't that mean the painted surface won't look as smooth? I though the smaller naps make it less textured looking? Also, I need to get a pole sander and sand the rough areas first. Will a pole sander get dust everywhere or will it just stay close to the wall? Can I just sand and then vacuum up the carpet in front of the wall after? What size sandpaper do I put on the pole sander?
 
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Old 01-18-16, 02:33 PM
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As long as you are sanding paint and not joint compound the dust will be minimal. Use 100 or 120 grit.
1/2" is a bigger nap than 3/8" although the extra roller stipple will be hard to spot. The main benefit is it holds more paint making it easier to paint the wall.
 
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