Sealing drywall in moisture-prone area

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  #1  
Old 01-29-16, 09:22 AM
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Sealing drywall in moisture-prone area

Hi Guys,

I'm currently working on a washroom in my basement, and the area above my shower is going to be very prone to moisture. The ceiling above the shower is somewhat "boxed in" because of a bulkhead running across the washroom (duct work), which gives the steam from the shower little room to escape.

I have installed a fan directly above the shower and used greenboard (which I know is not much better than regular drywall, and now I'm wondering if anyone has tips on what type of primer/paint I can use to seal the area as much as possible and protect the drywall from moisture.

Someone told me I should use shellac as a primer, but I've never heard that anywhere else, so I'm looking for more advice.

Is their anything I can do other that ensure I have a quality primer and bathroom paint?
 
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Old 01-29-16, 09:39 AM
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Solvent based primers do seal substrates better than latex primers. The downsides to using pigmented shellac or an oil base primer is the odor and they often raise the 'grain' of the drywall although that is easily rectified by a little sanding. Generally a latex primer is fine for your situation as long as it is covered by a coat or two of latex enamel. I'd recommend using a bath enamel as it has more mildewcide than other latex enamels.
 
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Old 01-29-16, 09:50 AM
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OK so regular primer, then bath enamel, then paint.

Will the paint stick to the enamel?
 
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Old 01-29-16, 09:58 AM
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Bath enamel is paint and would be the finish. Most can be tinted to the desired color.
 
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Old 01-29-16, 07:30 PM
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OK perfect - thanks !
 
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Old 02-09-16, 10:12 AM
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Hi Guys,

Hopefully someone is still following this thread and I get an answer without having to start a new one. I tried to take a picture of the situation so that you guys can see what it's like.

Seeing as how this is going to be a damp area and not a wet area, would normal primer and bathroom paint be good for this purpose, or would it be adviseable to use shellac and/or enamel?

If there is any confusion about the second picture, it was taken from inside the shower, looking up.

Thanks!
Nic
 
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Old 02-09-16, 10:59 AM
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It's perfectly acceptable to prime and paint [with enamel] those areas - it's done all the time. It's a good idea to clean any excess joint compound off the lip of the surround and then caulk where the drywall and surround meet. It's best to prime first, then caulk before applying the latex enamel.
 
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Old 02-09-16, 11:08 AM
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I have a feeling I am not understanding what you refer too as latex enamel. When I search for latex enamel, I get enamel floor paint.

Would regular kitchen and bath paint do?
 
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Old 02-09-16, 11:15 AM
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There are multiple types of latex enamel. Some is formulated for walls, some for wood work and a few for floors. Each type of latex enamel can be further specialized for specific job applications. Most any of them will work ok on your bath rm walls/ceiling. Latex wall enamel is the bare minimum while a bath enamel is preferred because it is formulated specifically for the environment of a steamy bath rm.

Yes, regular kitchen and bath paint will do.
 
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Old 02-09-16, 11:23 AM
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I would consider this to be the best choice for paint but it doesn't tint all that well so you end up with lighter colors other than white.

Zinsser® PERMA-WHITE® Mold & Mildew-Proof™* Interior Paint Product Page
 
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Old 02-09-16, 12:42 PM
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I'm going to be honest - I am confused now.

Regular primer - understood.

Regarding the "latex enamel" - is regular kitchen and bath paint latex enamel, or is the latex enamel a third thing I would need to add?

Sorry for being dense in this one...
 
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Old 02-09-16, 12:56 PM
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K&B paints are a version of latex enamel. Latex enamel can be a number of coatings, kitchen and bath enamel is a latex enamel that is tailor made for the harsher environment of kitchen and baths.
 
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Old 02-09-16, 12:57 PM
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got it - thank you !
 
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