Painting Wood Finish Dental Molding

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-31-16, 01:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Painting Wood Finish Dental Molding

Hey folks,

We just purchased a late 1980's home which has dental/piano/tooth molding with a wood finish. We want to paint it white. I'm considering undertaking the project myself. I understand that, with painting it is important to sand the surface. sanding dental molding is incredibly difficult if not impossible due to the general geometry of the product.

Here is an example:
Dentil Exterior Molding and Dentil Molding for Exterior

Is there any way to do this with a chemical or compound that will still allow for the primer and paint to adhere without sanding? Am I in over my head?

If so, what is the best chemical for this?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-31-16, 01:26 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 46 Votes on 43 Posts
Welcome to the forums. Sanding isn't necessarily essential but it's a good idea, especially when going over glossy paint. Keep in mind you're not looking to sand everything smooth, just roughen up the surface a bit with one pass so the next coat adheres better.
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-16, 01:31 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,045
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
I'd at least give it a hit and miss with sandpaper. What is the existing finish? Depending on the answer I'd likely give it a quick sand, wipe down with a liquid deglosser and apply a solvent based primer. You can then top coat with latex or waterborne enamel.
 
  #4  
Old 01-31-16, 02:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi,

Thanks for the advice. I'm note sure what type of finish the home has, however it has a slight gloss. Since the home was built in 1987, I suspect that it shouldn't be a lead based finish? From what I read, it was banned in 78.

Looking online, it appears that there are liquid sandpaper/deglosser options available. Considering the complexity of the molding, I think this may be the best option available.

Any thoughts as to what brand will work best?
 
  #5  
Old 02-01-16, 03:23 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,045
Received 118 Votes on 105 Posts
Is it a stain/poly type finish? If so it would either be polyurethane or varnish. No danger of lead.

I've used a lot of different brands of deglosser and never noticed much difference between them. I have noticed a new type of deglosser for sale that isn't solvent based - I've never used it and would be leery of it. Be sure to read the instructions!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: