Flaking paint on metal window frame

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  #1  
Old 02-10-16, 07:08 PM
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Flaking paint on metal window frame

I am renovating my basement and noticed the 2 window frames have a metal bottom frame that have metal flaking off. My idea to resolve the issue is to use a small hand sander to remove the flaking paint and simply use a paint brush to put a new layer of paint. I have a few questions:

1) Why would metal be used?
2) Why is it flaking? I don't notice any moisture nor do I see any damage to the sheet rock
3) Can basic interior paint be used (e.g. ceiling / flat paint)?
 
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  #2  
Old 02-10-16, 08:21 PM
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It's probably uncoated steel, used as a buck for the opening when the concrete was originally poured for your foundation walls. It will be a constant maintenence item for you to attend to. About the best I could suggest is to use a good rusty metal primer after you prep , followed by a coat of high gloss oil paint. (High gloss because it sheds water the best). Keeping it painted (getting to it before it gets any worse) is about the all you can do.

I think I have heard of some people etching the steel with acid prior to painting but I don't know much about that... other than follow the directions on the label.

Klean Strip | Phosphoric Prep & Etch
 
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Old 02-11-16, 02:53 AM
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I wouldn't bother trying to etch the steel. Sanding and wiping it down with a rag damp/wet with thinner should be enough prep. I agree with X's suggestion of materials. Latex paints have little rust protection properties and if applied directly to that steel would accelerate minor rusting.

You might consider applying the primer and then covering up the steel with a wood or marble sill.
 
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Old 02-11-16, 04:58 AM
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All good suggestions.
Something that's not helping the issue is that single pane aluminum framed window.
Warm moist basement air hitting that cold glass and frame is going to condense in that opening and end up on the steel.
 
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Old 02-11-16, 05:27 AM
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The steel wraps around the concrete, so being half inside and half out... the steel itself conducts the cold outside temperatures into the home, so it will always collect condensation and want to get rusty. Changing the window would not change that.
 
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Old 02-11-16, 12:41 PM
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This makes sense. I am 6' so I have to walk up to it and look in so it isn't obvious but it annoys me. Wife thinks it is cold/dark and hates spiders so I am doing whatever I can to make her happy. Sounds like sand/prep, primer, and then cheap oil pant and I am good to go.

Thanks

Shawn
 
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