Can a basic clothing Iron with steam remove a layer of paint ?

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  #1  
Old 04-08-16, 01:09 AM
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Can a basic clothing Iron with steam remove a layer of paint ?

I want to ask would a steam iron (using the steam feature) work or a clothing streamer such as the Conair Gs23 Professional Handheld Garment Steamer work in removing a single layer of paint from a wall or ceiling ? What about just using a hot water damp sponge could that work also in softening the paint and then using a scraper to remove the softened paint ?

http://www.amazon.com/Conair-Extreme.../dp/B006CR9KGA



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Old 04-08-16, 03:24 AM
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Why do you see the need to remove a layer of paint? Can't you paint over it?? Mark will be along after breakfast, but paint usually bonds too well to the substrate just to be removed.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 04:07 AM
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It is near impossible to remove paint from drywall or plaster! While denatured alcohol will dissolve dried latex paint if you tried to do that over a large area you'd wind up with nothing but a mess. Water [hot or not] will affect the substrate behind the paint more than the dried paint itself.
Why do you feel the need to remove the last layer of paint versus applying new paint
 
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Old 04-08-16, 06:24 AM
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Third person wanting to know why you need to remove a layer of paint instead of just covering it.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 09:13 AM
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If there is some reason the existing paint would be hard to cover or cause adhesion issues - there are primers that will take care of those issues.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 02:14 AM
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Hello everyone. The reason for the use of a wet sponge or water spray bottle is because there is lead in the paint. Hope the above helps
 
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Old 04-09-16, 03:11 AM
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Is the lead paint in good shape? not peeling
Generally it's acceptable to encapsulate sound lead based paint on walls/ceilings. You'd apply an oil base or pigmented shellac primer and then your choice of latex paint. Paint and varnish removers don't work well on plaster/drywall so the only way to remove the lead paint would be to remove the wall and hang new drywall.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 09:21 AM
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Yep, just paint over it is the first choice.

Any form of heat to remove lead paint is a bad idea as it can vaporize the lead.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 09:28 AM
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Sanding isn't recommended either! as that makes airborne lead particles if scraped, the chips need to be contained. The 2 main dangers with lead paint is inhaling the dust or ingesting the chips.
Unless the existing lead paint is a flat oil paint, it needs a primer to insure the latex will adhere.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 10:08 AM
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I'm certified with California and the US EPA in lead removal.

Please take Mark's advice and prime and paint. That's IF the paint is intact and there's no flaking.

It's good you know the paint contains lead, you can take steps to leave it undisturbed and keep areas clean.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 12:23 PM
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How long do strippers like Acetone or Denatured Alcohol take to work ?

Would anyone share their experience in working with strippers like acetone or denatured alcohol once applied ? Do they successfully remove a single layer or more with a single generous application of either of these chemicals ?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-09-16, 02:29 PM
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I don't remember what acetone does but denatured alcohol will 'melt' latex paint in short order BUT neither one of them is intended to be a paint stripper. What type of paint are you trying to remove off of what type of substrate?
 
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Old 04-09-16, 02:32 PM
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Mark, I think his question has to do with his previous question:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...yer-paint.html
 
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Old 04-09-16, 02:39 PM
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I didn't realize that was his thread

Forget trying to dissolve lead based paint off of plaster/drywall - it won't be effective! Denatured alcohol will not dissolve lead based paint, acetone might soften it up but again it's not going to strip off the paint.

If lead based paint on walls/ceilings is in sound condition it is the industry norm to encapsulate it! The only time lead based paint is stripped in a residential interior is on woodwork were chemical strippers [paint and varnish remover] can be applied and then scraped off. Some will remove the woodwork and have it commercially stripped in a tank.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 03:37 PM
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I have merged your two threads.

Why do you want to ignore the very good advice already given on handling lead paint.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 05:27 PM
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Please click on the link below. It's a verified EPA site.

Click on the link "protect your family...." The PDF brochure is available in many languages.

Rather than keep discussing how to remove the paint, can you explain why it is so important to you?

Are there infants or toddlers in the house and is there flaking paint? Do you own the home?

https://www.epa.gov/lead/protect-you...lead-your-home
 
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