Caulking baseboard

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Old 05-01-16, 05:13 PM
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Caulking baseboard

Not a question but a comment.

It's amazing how much better a painting project looks when a little extra time is taken to caulk the baseboards. It's something the builder didn't do but as I'm nearing the end of the current project and have the baseboard installed the results after caulking are night and day.

Since I was installing new flooring, I removed all the baseboard, sanded it (it was a mess) primed and applied 2 coats of paint.

It looks great after being installed against newly painted walls but ever better when caulked. There were some larger gaps but mostly the typical tiny gaps.

I was able to use almond paintable caulk since it matched the wall color pretty close. There is so little caulk it's hardly noticeable but the results are fantastic.

Almost 'professional' looking!!

Should anyone wonder if they should take the time to do this.....YES.
 
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Old 05-01-16, 05:30 PM
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The only draw back I will make is that molding is usually put on to hide imperfections and to be readily removed in order to repaint walls, replace flooring or repair drywall. Caulking it will make the removal job much harder when the time comes. But if you like the look then by all means do it.
 
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Old 05-01-16, 06:15 PM
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I always keep removal in mind since it will probably be -me- that has to remove it if it ever needs to be done. It's is such a small amount of painters caulk I'm sure that will be the least of my problems if it has to come off again!

I shutter when I read some folks using adhesive or large fasteners to attach things that may need to come off again.

Just came across a decorating article about building picture frames on walls using molding and it was suggested to use liquid nails to attach the pieces that can't be nailed to a stud.

Can you imaging tearing them off the drywall?

I used an 18 ga nailer and 2" brad to attach my pine baseboard and only where it was needed. The next person to remove it might laugh at how it was installed but better to be laughed at than being cursed at for making removal a nightmare.
 
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Old 05-01-16, 06:34 PM
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better to be laughed at than being cursed at for making removal a nightmare.
Got to agree with you there.
 
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Old 05-01-16, 07:11 PM
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A good caulk job always makes baseboard look better, you rarely see a straight wall.
You're doing the right thing by nailing. The only person I would laugh at is the one that used construction adhesive on baseboard, totally unnecessary.
 
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Old 05-02-16, 03:13 AM
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Most any woodwork that is painted should have all the cracks/joints caulked! That helps to make for a professional looking job. Generally if you see a new house built and the wood work isn't caulked it is because the builder or the homeowner did the painting. It's best to paint the caulk as unpainted caulk can attract dirt and become unsightly over time.

Adhesive is often beneficial if the walls are framed with steel studs.
 
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