Where and when to use Architectural Interior Latex Paint

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Old 05-19-16, 05:58 AM
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Where and when to use Architectural Interior Latex Paint

My title kind of says it all. (Marksr, this one's for you. )

Specifically we sell Dutch-Boy Architectural Interior Latex Paint in 5 gal and 1 gal containers, along with Dutch-Boy Dirt Fighter in gal containers.



Here's the back story. Customer chooses a 1 gal pail of Architectural Interior Latex Paint (semi-gloss). She wants to paint a bathroom ceiling. I try to talk her into a typical ceiling paint such as D-B Ceiling Paint or D-B Ceiling Solutions. Or our house brand Bright White ceiling paint. She says no, she must have a semi-gloss due to to excessive moisture in bath. She has an exhaust fan but she claims it's undersized and does not do the job. She also says she has a touch of mold in one spot. Also cost is important. She wants cheap paint! (What's a mother to do?). She claims a professional advised her to use Architectural Interior Latex Paint semi-gloss. Against my better judgement I tell her to at least use a Kilz primer stain blocker first. Several days later she comes back and complains that it's not doing the job. Not so much the ceiling problem, but that she used the same paint to make a striped wall using Architectural Interior Latex Paint and a blue paint. Using the blue painter tape as a barrier between the colors. A day later she pulls off the tape and the Architectural Interior Latex Paint peels off in sheets also pulling off the blue paint. Ruined her her whole project. She blames us (me) for advising her that it would be OK. We ended up giving her several gal of new D_B Dirt Fighter to appease her.

My question is not how to fix STUPID, but to give a clear explanation of how and when to use Architectural Interior Latex Paint.
 
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Old 05-19-16, 06:11 AM
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I'm not familiar with that particular line of paint. Latex enamel should always be used on a bath ceiling especially if there is a shower! The sheen isn't important. Most flat ceiling paints tend to absorb moisture rather than repel it. Whenever mold/mildew is an issue in a bath rm I like to use Zinnser's PermaWhite as it has superior mold/mildew resistance. Lower priced latex enamels are more prone to peeling than their quality counterpart.

Tape is often problematic, especially if the paint is fresh. It's always best to remove the tape while the paint is still wet/tacky as any bond between the tape and the paint applied over it will make it even more prone to peel the paint under the tape. Low tack tape helps but it's always best to limit tape use and when it must be used - remove it promptly. While it doesn't work well for striping you can take a knife and cut the paint bond between the tape and the wall to stop it from peeling when the tape is pulled after the paint has dried.

Assuming there were no stains or contaminants and the latex was applied over latex - there is no need for a primer, kilz or otherwise.


If you figure out how to fix stupid - we could get rich!
 
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Old 05-19-16, 06:19 AM
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Latex enamel should always be used on a bath ceiling especially if there is a shower!
Can I infer that all ceiling paints, and D-B specifically is an enamel? Or should I be advising to use a Kitchen and Bath for walls and ceiling?
 
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Old 05-19-16, 06:23 AM
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I know the term enamel has a fast/loose definition but most ceiling paints are flat, not water/dirt resistant and not very washable. I would never use a ceiling paint or any run of the mill flat paint on a ceiling in a bath rm. I have no problem with using a satin or eggshell enamel on the ceiling [actually prefer it to semi-gloss]

K&B paints are preferred for baths rm both because they are an enamel and they have extra mildewcide which also helps.
 
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Old 05-19-16, 06:32 AM
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Marksr, thanks for the feedback.

I'd like to get back to my original question.

Is anyone else willing to take a stab at where and when to use this Architectural Interior Latex Paint? (Or is this "Architectural" term just a branding ploy by D-B and has no real meaning.)
The D-B web site does not give a clear explanation.

It is my assumption that Architectural Interior Primer is used by new building construction and painter contractors on fresh wallboard and then Architectural Interior Latex Paint as a finish coat. I'm also assuming that this type of paint is not of highest quality. It's use is to give a finished move in appearance. Leaving the end user to choose his or her own color and quality of paint.
 
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Old 05-19-16, 08:37 AM
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I don't know what the term means. My only guess would be based on where it lies price-wise with other Dutch Boy products. My best guess is it's lower end and I would, therefore, likely never use it.
 
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Old 05-19-16, 11:38 AM
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I suspect it's just a name for that particular line of coatings, much like SWP's ProMar 200 [or 400,700 - increasing lesser quality] or their Classic 99, SuperPaint, Duration, etc. Generally coatings that are touted as builder grade are a cheaper grade of paint.

Going with SWP's ProMar line, the 200 is the best of their builder grade and does a decent job. Most builders use the 400 which IMO 'colors' the wall more so than paints it. 700 is the bottom of the barrel

While I've used DutchBoy from time to time I've never used it often enough to know much about their coating line up. Price is often a good indicator of quality so comparing the Architectural prices to their other coatings of the same type should be a good indicator of it's quality. Assuming you aren't going to be using their different lines of paint getting customer feedback on how well each one preforms [or doesn't] should also help.

As to when/where to use that line of paint - that depends mostly on the budget. Quality paints tend to cover and clean better than their cheaper counterpart. It's hard to go wrong using a better paint. It's hard for many to get past the initial price but overall, the price of the coating is minimal when compared to labor. First you match the type of paint to the job whether it needs to be flat, satin, semi-gloss or whatever. While all enamels can be suitable for walls, some wall enamels are not suited for woodwork.
 
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