Painting Shower Walls


  #1  
Old 04-16-01, 08:27 PM
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My bath/shower walls are half ceramic tile (lower half) and half painted wall (upper). What do I use to re-paint the upper half, which is regularly exposed to water? Someone suggested marine paint (used on boats). Is that correct?
 
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Old 04-17-01, 07:12 AM
Sonnie Layne
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Victoria,

Just an experienced guess... I think your bath was originally intended to be a bath only and the shower came later. This is problematic. Painting would only be a quick fix. Sooner or later you'll need to tile the upper half at least to the height of the shower nozzle. If you wait too long, extensive wall damage can be expected. I lay tile also, if I can help with that project. It's something you can do, believe me.

Having said all that. There are marine paints you can use, careful of the fumes!!! A good oil primer and topcoat of enamel (latex or alkyd) will provide good protection, I would probably lean toward the alkyd varieties in this case. The "bead" of paint along the corners and edges of the tile is critical as is adequate caulking to prevent intrusion of free water. Immediately after showering, wipe the walls down, that'll buy you some time as well.

Good luck

Sonnie
 
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Old 04-17-01, 09:50 AM
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Thanks for the good advice, Sonnie. Surprisingly, the "wall" part of the shower shows no sign of water damage yet. My reason for painting at this point is purely asthetic, just want to change the current colour. I'm moving into the place in two weeks, and during that time am doing extensive work on more urgent areas of the apartment, so I think I'll use the marine paint for now and plan to do the tiling at a later date. Will *definitely* seek (and follow!) your advice then....
 
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Old 04-17-01, 11:31 AM
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Victoria,
I think the marine paint is overkill. It's made like spar urethane - actually never cures completely so as to expand and contract in outdoor weather. Sonnie's suggestion of a good enamel(latex or alkyd) should be adequate. A semi-gloss paint will make it much easier to clean/wipe-over.
 
  #5  
Old 04-17-01, 04:48 PM
Sonnie Layne
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Hahahaha... actually fewalt, I was thinking more along the line of marine finishes such as West's System. 2-part isocyanate. That stuff'll cure harder than the Rock of Gibralter faster than you can clean it out of your sprayer!!! It would definitely seal the area off, but I'd be afraid to recommend it to anyone!!

Makes a great bar finish, by the way. I once applied it and geez, probably could have set up a whole industry with the pubs here. Of course I couldn't walk a straight line for a week after doing only 150 lineal feet of mahogany bar....

let's see, iso finish on a bar... isobar??? hehe

my very best,

Sonnie
 
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Old 04-17-01, 07:11 PM
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Sonnie,
I know what you mean about walking(not) a straight line.
Once when I was much younger I built a 200 gal. aquarium and painted it with P & L swimming pool paint. I didn't use a respirator: maybe that's why I'm a bit goofy now.
 
 

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