Painting Bathroom walls

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  #1  
Old 04-18-01, 08:07 PM
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Question

I'm moving into a new place and checked it out before I actually move in. I noticed the paint in the bathroom is falling off the one of the walls.

I obviously need a paint job in the Bathroom, my question is did the previous tenants use the wrong kind of paint for a bathroom? Second, what kind of paint should I use to repaint it?

Onother thing one of the rooms builds up mildew on the walls during the winter. What's up with that?

Please advise.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-21-01, 10:41 PM
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Well first of all, I recently painted my bathrooms, with Glidden Satin finish. You want to go with a satin finish in the bathrooms simply because of the fact that it cleans easier, and has a longer lifetime (it won't peel or crack). Depending on your tastes you can go with a variety of different custom colors. Go to a Home Depot, or Menards, and they should have all the samples laid out by the brand paint you want. Just tell them after you've chosen and they will punch it into the computer no problem. Things are done so much faster now.
 
  #3  
Old 04-22-01, 05:11 AM
Sonnie Layne
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Since you stated the paint is "falling off" I'd be inclined to think there was poor preparation before painting. Clean the walls, prime with an oil primer labeled to be topcoated with latex and finish with an enamel for bath/kitchen use (most manufacturers blend such things).

Mildew on walls, hmmm, is it only exterior walls? (I'm thinking vapor barrier) If it occurs on the interior walls as well, does it occur on the ceiling also? Is it a bathroom that has the mildew? Ceiling vent would cure that. Get back with us, maybe we can help isolate the problem. Of course it's possible a bad batch of paint was used and the mildew is only superficial.

later,
Sonnie
 
  #4  
Old 04-27-01, 08:22 PM
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Satin Finish on Bathroom walls.

A Satin finish sounds good to me.

What kind of preperation to the walls have to under go before I actually start painting, other that a primer?

 
  #5  
Old 04-27-01, 08:28 PM
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Mildew on the walls...

It's not one of the Bathrooms that builds up mildew, it's one of the bedrooms.

I'm planning to make this room my home office so I really don't want to worry about mildew build up. The current tenants said it happens only during the Winter. At this time of year I have no idea how much of a build up there is or any thing.

What would cause this, poor ventilation, leaky roof???

Is there any thing I can do to prevent this?

 
  #6  
Old 05-05-01, 05:29 PM
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me too

I too intend to paint over a wall/ceiling that has mildew.A bleach/water solution should kill it off but I am worried that it will return.This also seems to be a winter problem.
 
  #7  
Old 05-06-01, 04:44 AM
Sonnie Layne
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Mildew on ceilings... first I'd have a look in the attic. Make sure the insulation is adequate and nicely laid or blown evenly over the affected area. This will take care of the temp. differential between living space and attic crawl space. Next, while you're up there, look for evidence of leaking roof. Shouldn't be anything damp ANYWHERE. Check during rain if possible, (the attic will be cooler then, too). If everything else is cool, figuratively speaking, I'd be left to recommend more attic venitilation. Some homeowners still block the attic vents in the winter hoping to save some heating costs. This results in build-up of humidity in attic. Somewhere there's a formula for calculating the number of square inches of vent required for every square foot of attic space. This really should be calculated on cubic footage, but it's another issue. One place to start would be with your local building permit office. Or browse the net for "attic ventilation". One of the manufacturers of roof vents will know.

Sorry for the delay in responding, but I'm working 16/7 right now.

My best regards,
Sonnie
 
  #8  
Old 05-10-01, 11:05 AM
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The crawl space ventilation will have lots to do with the condensation problem too. Convection is what keeps the warm moist air rising. But it has to draw from somewhere.

Next is adequate insulation.
 
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