Help needed choosing interior paint - RegalSelect, Emerald, Duration, SuperPaint


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Old 12-16-16, 01:13 PM
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Help needed choosing interior paint - RegalSelect, Emerald, Duration, SuperPaint

I'm preparing to repaint my entire house after extensive renovations which includes ~1,300sqft of new (raw) drywall ceilings and ~3,000sqft of walls that were previously painted but now have many patches and fixes including a few walls that were fully skim-coated.

I'm planning to prime all surfaces followed by 2 coats of latex interior paint.
I have narrowed down my options for paint to the following (ordered by highest to lowest cost after applying all the discounts I can get):

Benjamin Moore Regal Select
Sherwin Williams Emerald
Sherwin Williams Duration
Sherwin Williams SuperPaint

I don't have a lot of painting experience so ease of application and overall finished look are my main concerns. I almost took Emerald off the list because I've seen it stated often that it's difficult to apply properly (leaving brush/roller marks).
The total price difference between the most expensive and the least is $200-$300 which is not very significant to me considering the overall cost and the time I'll be spending painting, so I'd like to make it as easy as possible for myself!

For any of you who have tried these paints, which one would you recommend for a beginner?
 
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Old 12-16-16, 01:20 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

I've used Regal and would use it again. Off the top of my head, Super Paint is not high end, but hang tight for Mark, as he know the SWP line better than I do.
 
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Old 12-16-16, 02:10 PM
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Paint always seems to be a topic of contention but I'll give you my 2 cents.

We had neighbours who owned a high end paint company. Think of mansions and that was all he painted.

His preference was Pratt and Lambert paint which I have used faithfully for 30 years. If there was a perfect paint this is it, super easy to install, no splatter, no roller marks (as long as you applied correctly), covers like crazy, and durable like you you have never seen, you can actually clean spots and the paint remains!!

The P&L paint is not cheap, like $45-$50 a gallon, but with paint you get what you pay for.

When I did my basement 3 years ago I tried some Sherwin Williams Emerald paint. It was cheaper and it was ok. More splatter and the finish was not as good.
 
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Old 12-16-16, 02:18 PM
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I've not used the Emerald but have used a good bit of SuperPaint and thought it was easier to apply than Duration. At one time SuperPaint was SWP's top line. Don't often use BM but have always been happy with the Regal line.

Don't forget to remove sanding dust and prime all the new or skim coated drywall. While most any primer will work on drywall some of the better primers will help make the finish coat more washable and help satin enamel [if used] to have a more even sheen.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 08:57 PM
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Thanks! This forum has helped me a lot over the years. Now I finally had a reason to join and post!
 
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Old 12-19-16, 09:05 PM
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Thanks Marq1! I've come across Pratt and Lambert before and also had an impression that it's a high-end product... I have a feeling it might be too expensive for me, but worth looking into.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 09:09 PM
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Thanks Mark! That helps me eliminate Duration!
Interesting that SuperPaint was once the top line product.
It seems that my choice (apart from the possibility of Pratt and Lambert), is now between SWP SuperPaint and Regal Select. I guess the question is: does the slightly higher cost of Regal Select really buy me anything?
As for removing dust, I was going to vacuum the surfaces before priming... or is there a better method?
I wouldn't have thought that the primer would affect washability! Would you recommend a particular brand of primer?
 
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Old 12-20-16, 03:12 AM
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IMO using a vacuum or damp mop/rag is over kill [not that it hurts] I normally take my push broom minus the handle and brush off the dust. It doesn't have to be perfect but you don't want a layer of dust to prevent the primer from getting a good bond with the drywall or mixing in with the primer making the wall rougher.

Zinnser makes great primers but so does SWP and BM. The main thing is to choose the correct primer for the application. Besides drywall you have to consider what the finish paint is going to be. Primers that seal the wall better will help make the finish paint more durable. The paint salesman should be able to help you make that decision.

Interesting that SuperPaint was once the top line product
As paints evolve they come out with newer/better coatings. Sometimes they pull the old line from the market, occasionally they put new/improved on the label but often they just start a new line of paint. SWP's top line coatings has changed many times over the years [just like most brands]
 
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Old 12-20-16, 10:20 AM
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Great, thanks for the pointers Mark!
 
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Old 12-21-16, 02:06 PM
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So I was talking to the person at my BM store today and she was recommending the Ultra Spec 500 Primer for all surfaces (raw drywall and previously-painted and patched areas). Apparently that's their contractor-grade primer, but the price seems to be less than half of their consumer-level "Fresh Start" primer. She was saying the only difference is that the UltraSpec cannot be used on top of existing oil paint.

Any opinions on the UltraSpec primer?
 
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Old 12-21-16, 02:10 PM
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I don't use BM coatings often enough to know a lot about them but if the salesman is recommending a cheaper alternative - it's probably fine. Unlike a paint dept, paint stores see a lot of commercial traffic and likely know what the pro painters like or dislike [what works or doesn't] .... and if it doesn't affect quality - we all like cheaper
 
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Old 12-21-16, 02:12 PM
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Emerald is now their top of the line, then Duration, then Superpaint.

Not familiar with BM primers, but avoid pva primers. You want a primer that is sandable. (Like SW premium wall & wood primer... Do it Best wall & wood primer is basically the same product.) After the wall is primed, lightly sand it with a pole sander to remove any grit.
 
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Old 12-21-16, 02:30 PM
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I've come across Pratt and Lambert before and also had an impression that it's a high-end product... I have a feeling it might be too expensive for me

I will say again, with paint you get what you pay for!

The P&L may be more up front but consider that it covers about 20% more than a cheaper brand, holds up 2X as good to wear and tear and cleaning.

I think it's a fantastic bargain!!!!!
 
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Old 12-21-16, 02:40 PM
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I've used P&L but not often enough to know a lot about their coatings. Most paint manufactures have cheap paint, quality paint and coatings that are in between. The better grades of paint usually cover better and often apply easier than their cheaper counterpart.
 
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Old 12-28-16, 05:02 PM
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So marksr, for the average homeowner that isn't on a tight budget, yet isn't looking to mortgage the house to pay for paint, what paint(s) would you not hesitate to recommend for:
1. Walls currently with latex paint on them
2. Doors currently covered with latex paint
3. Trim, most specifically baseboard, when the vacuum will repeatedly hit and rub
4. Cinder block walls, both bare and currently covered by latex paint
5. Shelves

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-29-16, 03:16 AM
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#1 - obviously you'd stick with latex for the walls. You need to determine which sheen meets your needs. Latex enamels are more washable. Since satin or eggshell enamel has the lowest sheen it's often a good choice, flat wall paint works for a lot of folks. I don't think you can go wrong with the SuperPaint line if using SWP.

#2 - ProClassic waterborne enamel is what I'd use although it is expensive. I like both how quick it dries and how tough the finish is. For a cheaper enamel you could go with ProMar 200 or better latex enamel. The real cheap latex enamels dry to a soft film and tend to chip when hit by furniture or whatever.

#3 - same as doors, casing and all other wood trim

#4 - most any latex paint. Cheap paints will preform better over masonry than anywhere else.

#5 - waterborne or oil base enamel. Cheaper latex enamels are prone to stick when objects with any weight are set on it for extended periods of time. The items can be removed with a little effort but sometimes they peel the paint. Flat latex won't have that problem but gets dirty easy and isn't as washable as enamel.

It's hard to go wrong buying the best paint you can afford! The better grades of paint generally wear and apply better than the cheaper grades. I've been on jobs where a cheap paint required 2 coats to cover while a better paint only needed 1 coat. I'd rather use a cheaper paint on the ceiling and spend the savings on wall/trim paint.

I mostly mentioned SWP because that is what I'm the most familiar with but most manufactures have good and bad paint and generally a line in between. I detest applying cheap paint! as it's harder to get a nice looking job with it and often doesn't wear as well.
 
 

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