Good Base to Laminate Over

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Old 01-04-17, 01:26 PM
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Good Base to Laminate Over

I'm remodeling a dozen+ bathrooms at a hotel to include new countertops, sinks, drains, splashes etc. The counter top people wanted too much money to make the skirt material so I'm fashioning myself. Using 3/4" OSB for the base and gluing the laminate to it. Last year, I had about 30% of the skirts give me grief with adhesion problems. 2 coats of contact cement on both surfaces, they stuck well until I went to cut them. I'm thinking it has something to do with wax in the OSB that interfered with the bond. It might also had to do with the cold as it was done during winter.

So, this year I was thinking I could paint the OBS to eliminate any issues and am looking for what would be best practices for something like this. Poly? latex? oil based? just primer? oil primer?
 
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Old 01-04-17, 01:32 PM
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I would think a coat of oil base primer would be all you'd need.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 01:55 PM
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OSB isn't used with contact cement and laminate... it isn't smooth enough. Use particle board or sanded plywood. Particle board is generally preferred because it doesn't warp Iike plywood can. (If a 4" rip of plywood is bowed when you laminate it, it wont lay flat... if you force it flat, the laminate might pop off due to the stress.) Warm temps when assembling are a must... the laminate, the glue and the substrate should all be room temperature. And everything should be rolled with a j-roller after the initial bond.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 02:23 PM
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Is there any way you can use MDF or HDF as a substrate? Flat, hard, smooth, just waiting for contact cement.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 04:09 PM
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Agreed. MDF or A grade plywood, one sanded face.

Rather than laminate an entire sheet of ply and rip it down, I would consider ripping the strips and laminating them one at a time in 8' lengths.
It doesn't take much longer.
The edges can be finished with a no-file bit or a 7 bevel bit.

The no-file bits save a lot of time, here's a link:
47150 Carbide Tipped No-File Trim .059 Radius x 1/2 Dia x 3/8 x 1/4 Inch Shank
 
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Old 01-04-17, 06:53 PM
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Thanks guys, was trying to keep the expense down so that was the OSB route and the thought of ever actually using particle board gives me the willies. Yes, I cut 9" strips first and then did the laminate and used a traditional laminate finishing bit similar to what was referenced. Contract is already signed so I will look at the cost factors associated with particle board vs hard board vs what I used before. Difference comes out of my pocket. But doing it right is the main focus.

X - room temperature in my garage at this time of year is a pipe dream.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 06:59 PM
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I spend a lot on propane this time of year. I hate working in the cold. Some things (like laminate) just won't work when it's 0F in the shop in the morning.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 11:48 PM
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I have a small window with favorable weather, will see if I can get things done. May have to break out the kerosene heater which hasn't been used in years.
 
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Old 01-05-17, 06:11 PM
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I have to buy a new blade for my miter saw. Any thoughts on number of teeth for cutting formica?
 
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Old 01-05-17, 07:12 PM
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12"? Freud D1296L is a decent one if you don't want to spend an arm and a leg. Thin kerf, triple chip teeth.
 
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Old 01-06-17, 07:04 AM
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I have one Dewalt 96 tooth blade that I have resharpened a few times, but an amateur sharpening is never as good as the real thing. I think I have over sharpened most all the blades I have. They cut but not nearly as clean as I would like them to. I like the diablo blades, have one in my skill saw and makes sweet cuts.
 
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