Paint coming off in sheets


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Old 01-25-17, 07:35 PM
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Paint coming off in sheets

So we are starting a kitchen remodel and I've pulled off some paneling, and trim and the when pulling the last piece of door trim off some paint started coming off with the trim. After removing the trim I started to scrap some of the paint to make sure I got all the loose paint off and here the paint literally started coming off in huge sections like sheets of paper. Luckily this wall is mainly covered with cabinets so I ended up removing pretty much all the paint on that wall.

I didn't have any issues on any of the other walls but now I'm super paranoid that the paint is going to fall off all the other walls moving forward. We did have another spot about the size of a basketball that started to "alligator" on another wall about a month ago which seemed weird to me that I painted the walls 6 years ago when we moved in.

So I will be repainting all the walls a new color with the model and I'm wondering if I should be worried about paint peeling in other areas or should I do some more prep work of a sort, and what I should do?

I think the issue may have been that they originally had wallpaper and then it seems like they didn't do enough prep work before painting over that as when the paint peeled off it pulled all layers with it? Plus the wall is very slippery under it as well.Name:  kitchenwall.jpg
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Also I have patching to do on the wall that has all the paint off and I'm wondering if it would be smart to prime the wall before mudding it or does it not matter?

Thanks in advance everyone!
 
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Old 01-25-17, 07:49 PM
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It's likely a masonry plaster with oil based paint. You will want to scuff sand the wall then prime it with Kilz original (or any other oil based primer). You can then follow with a latex paint. Adhesion is often poor on cold exterior walls or walls that have not been properly prepped. Latex will not bond well to oil based enamels... so other walls may eventually have problems if you applied latex over oil.
 
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Old 01-26-17, 12:17 AM
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that they originally had wallpaper and then it seems like they didn't do enough prep work before painting over that
The wallpaper was painted or the wall was painted after wallpaper was removed?
 
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Old 01-26-17, 02:50 AM
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I agree that it sounds like latex paint was applied directly over oil base enamel. Years ago it was commonplace for oil base enamel to be used on kitchen and bath rm walls. As X said - applying an oil base primer is the fix. .... http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html
 
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Old 01-26-17, 07:51 AM
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I missed the part about wallpaper... (thanks marq) the old sizing probably has something to do with it too. I'd also spray the wall with DIF, scrape it with a putty knife, rinse it, then oil prime.
 
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Old 01-26-17, 10:15 AM
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As soon as I saw the title of the thread my thought was latex over oil.
 
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Old 01-28-17, 08:54 AM
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Thanks everyone

Thanks for the followup, I think you're on to something as the house was built in the 50's so I bet there is oil paint involved as well.

As far as the wallpaper involved I don't believe the wallpaper was painted over, but simply that it was on the walls prior as when I pulled the base up there was still 3 inch tall pieces of wallpaper behind them.

I think XSleeper is on to something with the exterior walls as that was an exterior wall in my pic, probably obvious with the visible door , therefore the other exterior wall adjacent to it will be getting painted again as well, that being said am I smart to try to scrap the rest of the gray off on the other walls to try to avoid the paint coming loose in the future or should I pray for the best as I'm assuming that priming the gray like mentioned will not do a thing as the adhesion problem is below that, between the color I painted over and the coat under that one.

IF you do recommend trying to get all the gray off what is the best way to do so if it doesn't simply want to come off with a blade/ mudding knife? I'm assuming we are talking about a horrible labor intensive project?

Lastly the walls need some mudding in spots should that be done before or after the priming or does it not make a difference?
 
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Old 01-28-17, 09:31 AM
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Scrape off whatever is loose then coat the walls with a solvent based primer. Since there is a good chance the original paint was lead based it would be best not to sand the old paint. The age of the house indicates that the kitchen and bath walls/ceilings were painted with oil base enamel.
 
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Old 01-29-17, 09:58 AM
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solvent based primer

Marksr-
Thanks for the followup so are you referring an oil based primer when you say solvent based? Any brands better than others as I usually just use Menard's Zinsser's 123 primer but it doesn't look like that comes in an oil based.

Also so you're referring to priming all the existing walls, even those which haven't necessarily had peeling, is that right? Does the primer somehow penetrate down to the plaster through the other coats?

Also, I asked this earlier as well but doesn't it make a difference to mud and or spackle before priming?

Thanks again everyone!
 
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Old 01-29-17, 10:07 AM
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If you are shopping at Menards, they have several oil based primers. Zinsser Fast Prime, Zinsser Cover Stain, Zinsser Odorless. They all say oil primer.

Fix repairs prior to priming. Scrape any painted walls that you suspect to be loose before spackling and priming. And by spackle, I mean repair with joint compound, not lightweight spackle, which is for small repairs only.
 
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Old 01-29-17, 10:22 AM
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Solvent based covers both the oil base primers like X mentioned and pigmented shellac.
Well adhered latex paint doesn't need a primer unless repaired, the portions with exposed oil base enamel do - I'd prime them prior to applying joint compound. Most latex primers are fine for priming the j/c.
 
 

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