Proper wall primer after removing wallpaper

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Old 05-18-17, 04:50 PM
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Proper wall primer after removing wallpaper

I am getting to the point where I need to start thinking about paint on my walls, now that I have the wallpaper down. I am still scrubbing and making sure I have all of the sticky stuff off, and the last little remnants of paper. I still have over half of a gallon of the Zinzer bin primer that I used on my cabinets, but that is a very thin primer. I was thinking that I needed something that went on a little thicker since there are a few little divots/uneven spots here and there. It's not a lot, I mean the wall is really in pretty good shape in most areas. I do plan on spackling the more noticeable areas. So I am not looking for primer to cover all of that. Is there a primer that is typically used after removing wallpaper? The the surface seems clean but every time I go over it with a cloth it seems a little sticky. I honestly don't know if I will ever get every last little bit of it off.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:14 PM
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Hope your not using spackle to fix the flaws, that's only good for small nail holes.
I'd be using this as a primer.
Zinsser® BONDZ® Maximum Adhesion Primer Product Page
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:34 PM
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Yes, I am using it to fix small gouges, and nail holes. What else should I use?
 
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Old 05-18-17, 09:41 PM
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Ah, I forgot. Joint compound. Yep I forgot all about that stuff. Had some in the garage from the last time I took down wallpaper! Thanks!

Actually now that I am working on getting the walls ready, and the trim, it would be great if I could prime everything with the same thing. I have the Bin and I have to use it on the trim (all the same knotty pine as my cabinets) so that would make it so much easier if I could use it on the wall too.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 03:08 AM
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Zinnser's Gardz is specifically formulated to applied after the wallpaper is removed. It will seal any exposed gypsum, torn paper and leftover adhesive. Before the advent of Gardz we always used an oil base primer - any solvent based primer will work. Latex primers/paints won't seal the adhesive well and can cause problems where the drywall paper is torn. After the primer is dry it's usually a good idea to sand the walls before applying the finish paint.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 08:01 AM
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And please don't rely on the primer to 'fix' any imperfections on the wall, as the original post made me think you we hoping it would do that (it will not); that's what the joint compound does.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 08:41 AM
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Yeah I was not looking for it to fix anything other that just places where the drywall is not as smooth as the rest. Maybe paint will do that all by itself. I used the joint compound last night, and it works great. Very easy to use. I have looked for the Guardz. but it's not in Lowes OR HD, and I know the paint store probably charges an arm and leg for it if they have it. Amazon has it, so if there is a significant price diff, I'll just order it. Is it a product that really soaks into the wall? Just wondering if I should go with a gallon, or if I could get away with a quart. I'm guessing a gallon.

And I'll probably need the rest of the BIN anyway, for the trim. I did the trim on one door, and one small section of chair rail, and just from how much that used, pretty sure I will need every drop, if not more.

Oh...one more question about primer. My doors. I have a door to the laundry room (just a standard interior door) and two exterior doors (steel) that I need to paint also. I have cleaned them well, and the existing paint is in good shape - smooth and I suppose a semi-gloss. I wanted to use the same paint on them as I used on my cabs and soffit - which is a satin (but it's a fairly nice sheen - really looks more like a semi-gloss). So I need to prime all the doors. I used plain ol KILZ on my bathroom doors, and that did fine. Is it okay to use that on the steel doors or do I need yet another special primer?
 
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Old 05-19-17, 08:58 AM
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Yeah I was not looking for it to fix anything other that just places where the drywall is not as smooth as the rest. Maybe paint will do that all by itself.
No. You fix the wall with joint compound. That's it. Paint can actually make defects in the wall MORE apparent, please do not rely on the paint or primer to fix anything; make sure the wall is as perfect as you can get it before you prime and paint.

As to the doors, unless switching from oil based to latex, primer is not needed over existing paint. Give it a light scuff sand and then paint away.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 09:39 AM
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If I'm not mistaken your doors/trim are all stained/poly ?? if so they need sanding and a solvent based primer.

Most any solvent based primer can be used instead of Gardz where the wallpaper was.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 10:27 AM
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I read that your doors were painted and answered accordingly. If stained, the Mark is right about needing the (oil based) primer.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 11:09 AM
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No my doors are not stained wood. All my doors have a paint finish.

So just scuff sand and paint then Awesome. Thanks!
 
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Old 05-19-17, 11:12 AM
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I AM using the joint compound. All good. 😊
 
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Old 05-19-17, 12:31 PM
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Okay - I got the primer at the paint store. I asked for Gardz, and they gave me a gallon of AllPrime. They said it is the exact same stuff. So I probably could have found that at HD or Lowe's if I had known that. Water-based too, so that will be an easier clean up than BIN. Got my work cut out for me this weekend!!
 
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Old 05-22-17, 07:57 AM
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Is this the primer you got?
https://www.amazon.com/ALLPRIME-Wate.../dp/B01N0XB33F

I don't know anything about it but the description does not make me think it's equivalent to Gardz, especially since it's made by the same company.
 
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Old 05-22-17, 05:00 PM
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No. It is this:

https://www.allprocorp.com/Content/U...bSurfSlrTB.pdf

It is EXACTLY the same thing. Just a relabeled product for different sellers (paint stores).

AllPrime - Paint Talk - Professional Painting Contractors Forum

Driven by Decor | Decorating Homes with Affordable Style and Timeless Design

Gardz:
Lock down porous and crumbling surfaces with Rust-Oleum® Zinsser® GARDZ® Problem Surface Sealer. This low-odor, water-based formula dries to a clear, matte finish, creating a hard, paintable seal over damaged drywall, adhesive residues and other chalky surfaces.
Repairs torn paper on damaged drywall, eliminates bubbles
Seals skim coats & spackling
Protects new drywall
Seals old wallpaper adhesive
Easy to apply, high spread rate, fast drying
Water-base, low odor, dries clear


Allprime
:
Performance Characteristics
• Penetrates and seals wallcovering adhesive, texture and skim coats, spackling
and new drywall
• Locks down unstable surfaces
• Low odor
• Dries clear
• Soap and water cleanup
Recommended Uses – Apply to interior walls, ceilings and related surfaces.
ALLPRIME™ WATER-BASE PROBLEM SURFACE SEALER is recommended for sealing problem porous surfaces such as bare and damaged drywall, plaster, cement and cementitious coatings, spackling paste and joint compound, calcimine, stucco, acoustic and texture finishes, uncoated wallpaper, etc. ALLPRIME™ WATER-BASE PROBLEM SURFACE SEALER will also adhere to and seal in old wallpaper paste and adhesive residue. ALLPRIME™ WATER-BASE PROBLEM SURFACE SEALER has a milky blue color that helps to determine where it has been applied but dries water clear. It is formulated for use directly from the container; tinting is not recommended.
 

Last edited by yardnut; 05-22-17 at 05:58 PM.
  #16  
Old 05-23-17, 08:29 AM
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Ah, OK - good links there to explain it's the same stuff in a different can.

What's next?
 
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Old 05-23-17, 12:17 PM
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Next? Well I am still working on getting all the trim painted. And occasionally I take a break from that and do a piece of wall. The wallpaper did not come down completely clean of course, so I am having to go back over it with water/tsp substitute to get the scraps of backing left on the wall. Once I get all that done and smooth then I will put the primer on. Last night I used painters caulk on all the gaps in the trim/ceiling/cabinets. It's amazing how you don't see any of that when you have just the stained wood. But once you paint it white, Bam!! It sticks out like a sore thumb. Lots of work, but I'm already loving the brighter look. Still lots to do, but it will be so worth it when it's all done.
 
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Old 05-23-17, 12:24 PM
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Sorry, I meant what next with regard to the paint companies re-labeling products so we don't know what they are....

Thanks for the update, though.
 
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Old 05-23-17, 12:32 PM
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What I find more odd is that a Zinnser Gardz substitute is made by Zinnser but with a different label

Cracks/joints always show more when painted white versus most anything darker.
 
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Old 05-23-17, 01:33 PM
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Oh..LOL! Sorry I misunderstood.


marksr, I agree. It's wacky. It's not substitute either - it is the exact same product. When I called the paint store (it's a BM store) and asked if they had Gardz, the response was "Yup!". Not, "no but we have the same thing in a different can." I mean they KNOW it's the same thing, relabeled by Zinsser, for paint stores. They explained to me, but it sure is confusing for us consumers.
 
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Old 05-30-17, 03:07 PM
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For those of you that have used Gardz, do you need use a regular primer afterward, before putting on the paint? Just wondering, as it is a clear product. I don't have a final color chosen, but some of the areas just below the crown molding have a lot of dark drippy spots - must be either from the adhesive or crown stain. I was surprised at the finish of the Gardz - I was not expecting such a shiny finish. If additional primer is not needed (and I am hoping it is NOT) do I need to sand the Gardz? I was curious and tried a sanding block but honestly the finish is so hard, I didn't see any indication of scuffing. Boy I am SO tired of sanding. I am looking forward to being done with all this painting!
 
  #22  
Old 05-30-17, 03:18 PM
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Gardz is a primer sealer and as such doesn't have to have another primer applied prior to paint. Walls primed with Gardz often get reprimed with a regular latex primer because the Gardz is often applied before any repairs are made. Wall paint will cover regular latex primers better than Gardz but if you plan on applying 2 coats of finish it doesn't make much difference. A quick scuff sanding should be sufficient.
 
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