Paint roller leaving tons of tiny bumps. WTH?


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Old 06-13-17, 05:51 AM
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Paint roller leaving tons of tiny bumps. WTH?

So I am finally getting to the trim in the dining room, put on the first coat of paint last night. I have a entryway from my dining room into my living room that has a wide flat "jamb" so I thought I would use a roller. I have used paint rollers before, on walls, so it's not an entirely new experience. I purchased a Wooster mini cage frame with a couple of small covers - (a short nap for smooth surfaces). Not the cheap stuff - I got good ones. I rolled the paint on (the is the BM Advance I am using) and it looked pretty bumpy, bit I figured it would smooth out. Well, after I finished I looked closer and there are hundreds of teeny "bumps" all over the finish. I am so mad. Now I am going to have to sand the whole section again, and repaint. I don't have any such issue with a brush, and I never had this happen on walls. What is going on?
 
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Old 06-13-17, 08:53 AM
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It's not uncommon for rollers to leave an orange peel especially on woodwork. If you are going to roll the trim you basically have 2 choices; live with it or tip it off. Tipping off paint means you lightly drag a brush over the rolled on paint. Thinning the paint a little will reduce the severity of the orange peel but a brush is the only way to eliminate it.
 
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Old 06-13-17, 09:37 AM
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This wasn't even orange peel. That actually smoothed out nicely. This is teensy little pinhead sized bumps. I have never gotten anything like this with the brush so it is definitely not the paint. And I wiped down everything after sanding so there was nothing on the surface. It was clean. Could the roller cover have caused this? I don't know what else could have done it.

I darn sure won't be using a roller on trim anymore.
 
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Old 06-13-17, 10:46 AM
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I've never been fond of using rollers on wood trim. It's hard to comment more about the rolling defects without seeing it.
 
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Old 06-13-17, 01:03 PM
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Sounds like your paint raised hairs of wood fiber. Did you prime it first and then sand your primer? If not, thats likely the problem. You have to seal bare wood and lightly sand between coats to get a smooth surface.
 
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Old 06-13-17, 07:37 PM
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If you want a smooth finish the roller cannot have any nap at all, assuming it's not the wood.
The only roller I've had success with is a High Density foam roller (not the orange sponge type).

These are hard to find but here's a link to HD and they are not carried:
2-Piece Ultra-Dense Foam Mini Roller Cover and Frame Set-412-FOAMQH - The Home Depot

The part number is good, 412-FOAMQ. I use Roller Foam and Roller Lite Brands.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 08:54 AM
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Did you prime it first and then sand your primer? If not, thats likely the problem. You have to seal bare wood and lightly sand between coats to get a smooth surface.
Oh definitely. That was NOT the problem. I have become something of an expert in painting stained wood after doing all my cabinets and trim. I know the process well. But I have not used a roller on wood trim, ever. Clearly not the best option.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 09:00 AM
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Often painting the woodwork with a roller works best for those with poor brushing skills. The roller stipple can be preferable to brush and/or lap marks. Not how I would do it - just saying
 
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Old 06-14-17, 09:02 AM
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Thanks Handyone, that might be an improvement. These covers did have a very very short nap, but they were advertised for a "very smooth finish" so that's why I tried them. It was not the wood - this was a well-sanded, smooth, primed, surface.

In any event, I sanded it down, and repainted last night. I'll do another coat tonight. I think it will be fine. It actually looked like tiny air bubbles after looking at it closely. I researched a bit and some suggest that this is caused by rolling too fast, but I really don't feel that I did that. I might try those other covers in your link, on some scrap primed wood, just to see how they perform. Kind of got my curiosity up. For now though, I have a one full coat on the dining room trim, and will get a 2nd coat on this week. And then I just have the doors to do as far as trim painting. After that, I get to pick out some actual color to put on the walls...finally. Progress...slow, but sure.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 09:06 AM
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Rollers also work better on trim when using oil paints... the paint dries slower and so has more time to flow. Latex paints tack up quickly, so when you back roll something with a roller, it's already tacky and so the stipple quickly dries before it has a chance to smooth out.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 09:07 AM
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Often painting the woodwork with a roller works best for those with poor brushing skills. The roller stipple can be preferable to brush and/or lap marks.
I expect that your skills are far superior to mine! Even so, I prefer the looks of my brushing to the roller marks. It never occurred to me that the roller would do that, either. I've only used rollers on bathroom walls - and never had any issues with undesirable roller marks. Live and learn.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 09:10 AM
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Rollers also work better on trim when using oil paints... the paint dries slower and so has more time to flow. Latex paints tack up quickly, so when you back roll something with a roller, it's already tacky and so the stipple quickly dries before it has a chance to smooth out.
Agreed, however I am using a waterborne paint that is exceptionally slow drying. Not using latex. This BM Advance stays wet a long time.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 09:10 AM
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Half of doing a good paint job is the motivation to do it right. Those that don't care or just want to get it done usually make the rest of us look better. Most mistakes in paint application are easily rectified. Speed comes with practice.

SWP's ProClassic waterborne tacks up quicker than latex so there is a small learning curve. I'm surprised that the Advance is slower drying - but I've never used any.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 09:19 AM
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I will be looking at both BM and SW for wall paint. But for now, I have lots of Advance to use up! I still have the 3 doors to paint. I might try one of those foam rollers if I can find one in the store.
 
 

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