Paint outside of my shop


  #1  
Old 06-26-17, 09:24 PM
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Paint outside of my shop

Here's the deal. We are buying another home & selling the current home.

In 2001, I built a 16 X 24 wood frame shop on blocks. I put that 4 X 8 fiberboard siding stuff on the exterior & framed out the doors with 1 X 4's. Its not been painted since.
I bought whatever HD guys suggested for the outside paint. I have no clue.

Since we are selling (signed papers Friday & will list this week), so I need to repaint the outside to freshen it up.

I am figuring 2 gallons of paint...????
I am figuring the cheapest exterior paint I can find (prefer HD cause I already gotta go there anyway for some other items) cause ..... we are moving & in all honesty, I just need to get some paint spread on it.
I need white paint for the fiberboard siding & dark chocolate brown paint for the trim. I figure a 1/2 gallon for the trim (eaves, 1 door & 3 windows.
I am going to roll the walls & brush the trim. I am assuming I need oil base??? but I dont have a clue. I am dumb as a boot when it comes to paint.
Oh, & prefer something that dries fast.... 3 or 4 hrs... surely under 6 hrs to dry.

Any input on c-h-e-a-p exterior paint (brand & type ) & any other basic advice to just quickly & cheaply slap some paint on there. I hope within a 3 or 4 weeks, I ain't gonna have to deal with it anyway.
We started the paperwork on the new 1968, ranch style house by the lake on 5 acres last week. So, hopefully, I'll be moving by mid July.

Thanks in advance for all relative advice
 
  #2  
Old 06-27-17, 02:58 AM
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What is the condition of the existing paint? If it's chalky, fresh latex paint won't adhere well. There are 3 ways to deal with the chalk; wash it off [often doesn't all come off], coat with an oil base primer or add Flood's EmulsaBond to the 1st coat of latex. Failure to address the caulk almost guarantees the new paint will peel although it could take 6 months to 2 years.

I don't often use the cheap grades of paint. Besides longevity, the main drawback is how it applies. The better paints generally cover better and have less roller splatter.
 
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Old 06-27-17, 03:53 AM
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Mark, the existing paint is 16 years old & is not flaking, but because the siding is that fiber material, overtime the paint has come off... worn off. You can see some spotty places where the paint is missing down low, mainly because we flooded last year & below the water line (about 12" or less).
In the end, the siding is not "flaking" like the wood trim around the windows & doors. Its like that fiberboard is just beginning to deteriorate slightly. The worst is closest to the ground because the edges weren't painted once installed.

The paint on the trim is flaking.

You're saying latex... I just assumed I'd use oil base.... but, that's why I am asking cause I don't know.
 
  #4  
Old 06-27-17, 04:43 AM
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Chalk is when you run your finger across the paint and get a white substance on your fingers. That chalky powder prevents latex paint from bonding well. Oil base primers/paints will bond thru the chalk although it's still best practice to remove what you can. What I often do is wash the siding and then add Flood's EmulsaBond to the 1st [or only] coat of latex finish paint. An oil base primer will better seal the substrate from moisture.


For a quick cheap paint job; I'd wash the siding [rinse well] and once dry apply 1 coat of flat latex paint or solid stain with EB added.
Oil base finish paints generally cost more than their latex counterpart and in the south they often fade/deteriorate faster.
 
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Old 06-27-17, 06:05 AM
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One idea you could look into is a "hybrid " solid colour stain . Hybrid meaning.... it's half oil and half latex in one . Goes on like latex and dries and cures like a oil . Not sure if HD carries it , while most paint stores do .
 
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Old 07-02-17, 01:16 PM
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For the siding you might consider an exterior weatherproof paint with high solid content. Look at some of the stucco type paints and see if it's also recommended for wood/fiber siding. Being that it's thicker you will probably need 3 gals. For the trim, look at the selection of 'Oops' paints at HD. They sell mis-matched, mis-mixed paint for less than half price of a regular gallon. Any exterior latex will work as long as the trim has been primed. Colors are limited but if you can find a light color it's not too difficult to mix it to a dark brown as long as you are not trying to match to an existing color.

I get a lot of my paints from the 'oops' selection. I'll buy a gallon color I find suitable for eventual use and buy small odd cans of darker color to mix in. As long as you mix water based paints together and not too particular with the eventual color you can save a lot of money.
 
 

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