Finishing Wainscotting

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Old 07-29-17, 07:58 AM
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Finishing Wainscotting

I just love, Wainscot around the house; and when I did a little research...it didn't seem, like the most complicated DIY to tackle.

I based my work, off a video; which I may not be able to refer to here.

I have to say: to an extent...I was rather pleased, with my results.

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Don't laugh I mean, at this point; I was really pretty encouraged. This was the design I wanted; and it seemed like the finishing touches, were just a matter...of simple formality.

And now, is where you all start laughing; because as I've learned...those are the parts, that differentiate an "amateur" job from a "professional" one.

So...the project, lies stuck; here...

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At this point; I have 2 main problems...that I know of...to tackle:

1) My carpentry work, was not super accurate. So while they weren't HUGE; I did have some gaps in my boards, that needed compound. My though-process? Go heavy...make sure you fill the gaps; you can always sand-down, to a nice finish. Ugh...I found out, not so much. This stuff (and I don't even remember, what I used at this point. I'm sure I can find it; but probably DAP spackling compound); kinda a b*tch, to sand down.

Hand sanding wasn't doing the trick. Checking it, as I'm posting; it seems like it's not in as bad as shape, as I thought; after I took a Palm Sander to it.

So...if I think it's smooth and seamless enough; do I just go for it. Clean, prime, and paint; cross my fingers, and hope for the best?

Issue 2, in next post. I think I need to take some pix for that...lol
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 07-29-17 at 09:11 AM. Reason: Removed non beneficial comments
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Old 07-30-17, 07:02 AM
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No mercy, for the new bee?
 
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Old 07-30-17, 08:40 AM
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Part of the problem is to many words. Just a couple of paragraphs to ask your questions and pictures at the bottom would have been better.

I'll move your thread to Painting & Staining and see if you get more replies.
 
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Old 07-30-17, 08:43 AM
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It's not clear as to what exactly you're asking and what you need help with.
 
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Old 07-30-17, 09:06 AM
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Sorry. 1st post; lots of background. Plus...I warned I was "meticulous"; but maybe that got edited out, by the mods.

I have to admit; I've never been truncated before.

In my experience...part of the process, of welcoming in a newbie; is to draw pertinent info out of him. If I knew what was what; I wouldn't have so many questions, and be here in the first place...right?
 
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Old 07-30-17, 09:10 AM
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<<It's not clear as to what exactly you're asking and what you need help with.>>

I would think...like a lot of weekend warrior amateurs; I've gotten myself, into a pretty common situation.

Knew how to start; not sure how to finish.

So...if you want me to cut to the chase: how do I finish this??
 
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Old 07-30-17, 09:27 AM
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Where were you putting the compound? Gaps and joints should be caulked. Nail holes usually get filled with painter's putty.
 
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Old 07-30-17, 11:11 AM
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Caulking tips:
  • Use acrylic latex caulk.
  • Do NOT use oil based caulk. It is too hard to work with.
  • Do Not use pure silicone caulk. Can't be painted. Harder to get a neat job.
  • Have a bucket of water and a sponge or good quality papers towels ready when you caulk. (Cheap paper towels won't work well)
  • You do not sand caulk. Apply, let set for a few minutes, scrape off excess with a putty knife*, then smooth and remove remaining excess with a damp sponge or paper towel rinsing often.
  • If you want you can put painter's tape on either side of where you caulk. Smooth with sponge. Let set and remove the painter's tape.

While painter's putty is traditional for nail holes you can use your finger to dab on a bit of caulk then wipe smooth with a damp sponge or paper towel. Save any excess scraped off with a putty knife on a board and dab the nail holes before it sets up.

If the wood does need touch up sanding to smooth it do before caulking.

*When using a putty knife drag it, don't push it.
 
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Old 07-30-17, 11:17 AM
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I'd recommend using a siliconized acrylic latex caulk, it's a little better than just acyrlic latex and is paintable. While I prefer a damp sponge, a damp rag also works well - never tried a paper towel.

The caulk should either be applied prior to priming [let the caulk set up first] or between the primer and finish coat after it's been sanded.
 
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Old 07-30-17, 11:29 AM
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Mark wrote:
I'd recommend using a siliconized acrylic latex caulk
Mark's the painter, I'm the wood butcher so follow his recommendation on caulk. Siliconized is good just don't confuse it with pure silicone. That you do not want.
 
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Old 08-01-17, 11:28 AM
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Sorry guys. After all that; it may have been for naught.

When I went to have a closer look (project has been sitting dormant, for months); I guess I did get it down smooth and paintable...and just didn't think so.

So...started painting; but don't worry. I'll have some questions, about trim and "finish"; or will that, have to be posted elsewhere?
 
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Old 08-01-17, 12:50 PM
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Did you caulk the joints? they often become more visible once paint is applied. Generally it's best to keep a related thread together, that way those of us with a poor memory [me ] don't have to jump around to keep up.
 
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Old 08-02-17, 12:40 PM
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Yeah; I'd prefer to keep it together; but you guys seem pretty strict, about staying on topic.

When I go from painting, to trim to give it a finished look; will it be OK, to leave it here?
 
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Old 08-02-17, 12:49 PM
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When I go from painting, to trim
Not sure I know what you mean by that statement Are you referring to painting the trim or installing wood trim? You may find more carpentry answers in the carpentery section .... although some of the carpenters also check the painting forum.
 
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