Exterior Repair and Painting of Damaged Wood Siding


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Old 09-28-17, 05:38 PM
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Exterior Repair and Painting of Damaged Wood Siding

Hi, what needs to happen here (hopefully I uploaded the picture correctly)? As you can see, the paint has peeled off to the bare wood in many parts. For the siding to look good/uniform again, does the entire peeling part have to be stripped or will scraping be sufficient? I fear that with just scraping, some paint will remain adhered to the wood and the finished product will not look good. Before painting, is there a particular primer that should be used (I plan to use acrylic latex paint). I was not sure if I could do this on my own, so I had different contractors come to the house to give bids, but the quotes seem really high, given that there is such a small area of the house. In addition, most of them didn't give me much comfort that they wouldn''t just scrape a little bit and throw some paint up. One painter said that he would need to use wood filler (Bondo, I think he said). Another painter wrote the following as has proposal "To scrape off all peeling paint from rear garage siding wall. To patch with Ready Patch all rough areas to make siding look even and smooth out." Iím not sure if Ready Patch is appropriate for wood siding. The painter who suggested Read Patch only did so when I said that I wanted the whole area to look uniform and smooth. His bid increased by $300 when he said he would use Ready Patch. By the way, how much time must the primer dry before the paint is applied, and how much time must pass between the 1st and second coats? Any comments or suggestions would be very welcome.
 
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Old 09-28-17, 06:40 PM
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Somethings really wrong to have paint peeling off in sheets to bare wood like that.
Mill hardened siding, no vapor barrier on the inside wall, someone painted without applying a primer first to bare wood, no gutters and the waters running down the wall.
If it was my house it would be vinyl sided by now.
Going to keep that siding, It needs to striped back to bare wood with a chemical stripper, scraped, sanded primed with oil base primer then two layers of latex paint.
 
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Old 09-28-17, 07:24 PM
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Thanks so much for the reply. The gutters are in disrepair, so I believe there has been water running down the side. Would the parts of the siding where there is no substantial peeling need to be stripped as well? Would the Redi Patch need to be applied? What is mill hardened siding?
 
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Old 09-29-17, 02:10 AM
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I'm not fond of using fillers on siding. They are prone to fail over time and even if they didn't come loose, if the surrounding paint peels you still have a ridge. It's a whole lot better to scrape and sand as needed. Most customers are unwilling to pay the extra labor for sanding so that step is normally skipped. Fillers are a cheap way to get rid of the transition between raw and paint but isn't a good long term solution.

I'd start by scraping the siding and then see where you are at. While a chemical stripper would remove all the existing paint and give the best substrate for new primer and paint, it's hard to say at this point if you need to go that far.

Usually oil base primer does the best although there are times when latex primer is better. Oil primer takes longer before you can top coat with latex although overnight is usually sufficient. All paint can labels will give the suggested recoat times. A quality latex house paint is always preferred for the finish.

almost forgot welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 09-29-17, 08:10 AM
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Hi Marksr,

Thanks for your response. If I scrape and sand, wonít there be a ridge at the point where part sanded down to the bare wood meets the paint that is still well attached to the wood? Does it make sense that a bid would go up $300 for using Redi Patch? Is there a great deal of additional work involved in that? Some people on "the internet" have said something about applying some kind of moisture protection. Is that a real thing or a waste of time? I do know that I have to address the water issue (I think it's the gutters).
 
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Old 09-29-17, 09:00 AM
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Sanding should be enough to make the transition blend. It may be visible if viewed from an angle, the more sheen the paint has the visible it might be. IMO it's not something the average person would ever notice.
 
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Old 10-01-17, 07:12 AM
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Thanks so much for your help. Is this a project that can be done in one day, or do I have to leave a day between applying the first coat and second coat of paint?
 
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Old 10-01-17, 09:30 AM
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If you use an oil base exterior wood primer you'll need to give it a day to dry before you can apply the latex house paint.
 
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Old 10-13-17, 05:27 PM
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I have decided to use Benjamin Moore Aura exterior paint because it seems to be very good, but I am very confused about primers. One site said "Wood, whether inside or out should be coated with an alkyd or oil primer. Latex is not a good choice here because of the moisture issue. Wood will absorb and expel moisture through the pores constantly as the atmosphere changes. This is particularly true outside where rain and humidity, sun and wind affect the moisture content in the wood. If you use a water-based coating it will lose it's bond with the wood as the moisture moves in and out, causing it to peel off and take the top coat with it." However, I remember reading somewhere that if there is a moisture issue, latex primer should be used. Given that my peeling appears to be related to moisture, what primer should I use under the Aura paint? Can latex paint even be applied over oil based primer? I tried asking the person in the Benjamin Paint store, but it was clear that he didn't know anything about paint or primers. He told me to buy the primer for both interior and exterior, but couldn't explain anything about why I should use that primer as opposed to another primer.
 
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Old 10-14-17, 03:09 AM
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Oil base primers suck into the wood better and do a better job sealing against moisture. When the moisture is from the exterior it is always best to use an oil primer over raw wood. The exception is on older houses that don't have a vapor barrier. Often with those old houses moisture will migrate thru the walls [from the inside] which can cause the exterior paint to lift.
 
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Old 10-14-17, 05:59 AM
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Thanks. The house is 80 years old. I have no idea what a vapor barrier is or if it has one. That said, I have had a gutter problem (which I am addressing). Is it okay to use Benjamin Moore Fresh Start all purpose interior exterior latex primer?
 
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Old 10-14-17, 12:54 PM
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A vapor barrier is plastic they staple up over the studs and insulation in order to better seal the house. Unless your house was extensively remodeled the odds are it doesn't have a vapor barrier. Latex primer would probably be better.
 
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Old 10-16-17, 07:02 AM
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Thanks so much!! I've now moved on to the wood shutters. I took them down, and I have completely sanded off all of the old paint down to the bare wood. Should I use an oil based primer since they are wood? If I use oil based primer, can I still use Benjamin Moore Aura latex paint or would I need an oil based paint as well? If I use an oil based primer do I need to wait a full day to paint? Actually, I was thinking that it might be easier to spray prime and paint. Is that an option?
 

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Old 10-16-17, 07:27 AM
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An oil base primer would be best. You can top coat with latex just make sure the oil has dried sufficiently. That often takes a full day, somewhat dependent on temperature and humidity.
 
 

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