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Nicotine Kitchen/High Build Primer or Skim coat, etc.


beedoola's Avatar
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02-07-18, 09:14 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Nicotine Kitchen/High Build Primer or Skim coat, etc.

I'm redoing my house that my sister and I inherited from my dad. He and my stepmom smoked inside - including the kitchen.

The kitchen ceiling had some crappy mudding/texturing which I now have to fix.

I can sand any high spots/knife marks but I'd prefer not to skim coat the whole ceiling.

First: Do I need to wash the ceilings with something like Krud Kutter before sanding it and then mudding - if I go that route - or would sanding be enough to rid of any nicotine or anything that could cause an imperfect adhesion to the ceiling?

Second: if I sand the high spots on the ceiling, could I do 2 coats of a high build primer? Would that kind of level it out some what?

 
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02-07-18, 09:31 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Washing and sanding are both good ideas but either way in the end you will still need to apply primer. Oil primer like Kilz "original" or a pigmented shellac like B-I-N. No latex primer. Primer does not level bad drywall. You will have to skim coat it after you prime.

 
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02-07-18, 10:40 PM   #3 (permalink)  
So sanding>oil based primer>then skim coat?

A latex primer would be fine on top of the skim coat though.

 
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02-08-18, 03:49 AM   #4 (permalink)  
Correct, you need a solvent based primer to seal any nicotine that doesn't wash off. Nicotine will bleed thru latex although latex primer is fine for the fresh joint compound or anything else.


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02-08-18, 05:53 AM   #5 (permalink)  
I have also had good luck with Zinser 123 oil base primer. Nicotine is a big problem though so after applying the first coat look to see if any yellow is still bleeding through.

If you are wanting to smooth the ceiling and because of the nicotine I would consider removing the popcorn texture altogether. There are numerous websites and videos that show you how. Removing the very porous popcorn will also make controlling the nicotine staining easier.

As for the rest of the house EVERY surface will need to be cleaned; floors, walls, ceilings, cabinets, windows and doors. I use grease cutters like Purple Power or Simple Green. Wear rubber gloves, spray it on and wipe off/scrub lightly with a damp rag and rinse your rag out often.

 
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02-08-18, 08:19 AM   #6 (permalink)  
I usually only clean the worst of the nicotine. IMO it's easier/quicker to just apply a solvent based primer to seal it.


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02-08-18, 08:46 AM   #7 (permalink)  
Yeah, I'm aware I can use latex to block the nicotine.

So Marksr, you're saying I could forgo washing the ceiling down and just using an oil-based primer? Would a skim coat adhere to that primer coat?

Piolt Dane - there isn't any popcorn texture. Someone just didn't do a good job of mudding in and left knife marks and some uneven spots.

 
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02-08-18, 09:04 AM   #8 (permalink)  
No, water based latex paints will NOT stop the yellow nicotine stain. Even water based stain blocking primers often let the stain through. You need to use an oil based stain blocking primer.

 
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02-08-18, 10:07 AM   #9 (permalink)  
As stated above, even a stain blocking latex primer has a good chance of letting nicotine bleed thru - maybe not immediately but the nicotine will discolor the new paint unless sealed with either a good coat of oil base or pigmented shellac [BIN] primer.

I've never had any issues with joint compound adhering to any primer or flat paint.


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02-11-18, 11:19 PM   #10 (permalink)  
Yes, I mistakenly said "can" when I mean't "can't" regarding latex not being able to cover nicotine.

 
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