Best brush for trim/molding

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-21-18, 01:04 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 403
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Best brush for trim/molding

What's the best kind of brush to use for baseboard molding and door trim?

Have been having decent luck with 2" angled brushes, but occasionally it gets a bit streaky (raised streaks as, I think the brush dries out a bit between uses). As I posted in another thread, we can't clean our brushes due to septic, so we just do our best with plastic bags. But I think it eventually dries out a bit, and I get these raised streaks.

Am I better off with a foam brush? Or just keep tossing the angled brushes and use new ones as necessary?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-21-18, 03:05 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
Use the best brush you can buy. You clean them out with a hose at the back of the yard and not into the septic system. Part of painting well is having good tools to work with, foam brushes and cheap brushes will only frustrate you. Buy quality Purdy or Wooster brushes and clean them out - outside after every use.
 
  #3  
Old 03-22-18, 01:19 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,665
Received 323 Votes on 287 Posts
I'm also partial to the Purdy brand. IMO there is no one size fits all brush. I have multiples as some work better for some trim work than others. The type/brand of paint can also sometimes make a difference. I detest foam brushes.

I rarely clean up a brush in the sink, I almost always clean up outside with a garden hose. Just rinse off the grass [or whatever] well when you are done. All you need to do is rinse the paint residue off the ground - it doesn't hurt the grass, just looks unsightly.
 
  #4  
Old 03-22-18, 06:20 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 403
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I guess I shouldn't paint in the winter then.... In another couple of weeks or so I'll be turning on the outside hoses again.
 
  #5  
Old 03-22-18, 08:39 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,571
Received 375 Votes on 350 Posts
Clean up where ever is convenient, doesn't make a difference!

I use foam brushes for varnish, lays down a nice level coat and then toss, but never use for paint.

Check eBay, years ago I bought a lot of 20 Purde 2nd's for a couple dollars a brush, 20 some years latter I am still using them!

Great brushes!
 
  #6  
Old 03-22-18, 12:22 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,665
Received 323 Votes on 287 Posts
I guess I shouldn't paint in the winter then...
A little bit of paint clean up washed down the drain isn't a big deal although it's better not to. Use a work pot to do your first cleaning and then toss that water outside.
 
  #7  
Old 03-22-18, 12:25 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,580
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
Ok, so I've never lived with septic - why can't one put latex paint into a septic system? It's legal to put it down a drain so it can't be a pollution problem.
 
  #8  
Old 03-22-18, 12:31 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,665
Received 323 Votes on 287 Posts
While I doubt it would cause the system to fail, I also doubt it's good for it. Just like you wouldn't want a garbage disposal on a septic system.
 
  #9  
Old 03-22-18, 12:38 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,580
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
Garbage disposal would lead to more solids and therefore more frequent need to pump out, right?
 
  #10  
Old 03-22-18, 01:02 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,665
Received 323 Votes on 287 Posts
Ya, it's all about keeping stuff out of the tank that won't readily break down.
 
  #11  
Old 03-22-18, 01:13 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 67 Votes on 61 Posts
We're on septic, but, regardless, in the winter I use a bucket to get the bulk of it, toss it outside, sometimes might use a second bucket, and do the final clean up in the utility sink. I can't imagine there being enough whatever left at that point to hurt anything. And regardless of the season, if it carries into more than one day I usually seal my brush in a baggie and leave it someplace cool overnight (just not freezing). A few times in the summer I have even stuck them in the bottom of the second refrigerator. I've never shied from a hard days work, but who wants to clean brushes any more than they have to? Now my wife on the other hand, my really great wife, who helps me a lot and particularly enjoys working with me in the shop, doesn't like painting so usually leaves it to me, but when she does she somehow manages to get paint from one end of the brush to the other, so hers get cleaned at the end of each shift.
 
  #12  
Old 03-22-18, 01:24 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,665
Received 323 Votes on 287 Posts
when she does she somehow manages to get paint from one end of the brush to the other
I've worked with some painters that were like that Personally I can't stand for paint to get on the palms of my hands!
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: