Primer on plaster bubbling/peeling when applying anything (!!) on the wall

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  #1  
Old 01-02-19, 11:18 AM
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Primer on plaster bubbling/peeling when applying anything (!!) on the wall

Hello guys,

first post on the forum. First of all happy new year and best wishes for 2019! I am not native English so i will try to make myself as clear as possible.

I applied a primer on the newly plastered walls of my living room. The plastering was done in April/Mey 2018 so it got like 6+ months to dry. Before painting I hand sanded the surface and cleaned it with a damp tissue. I hand checked the surface and there was no trace of dust whatsoever. I primed the wall using Capaprim from Caparol. Already when applying the primer, i got some issues... during the application i could have some of the paint peeling off when i was trying to spread the paint over the wall. So basically i couldn't do many passes otherwise i could end up with lots of zones without primer. I also tried with another primer and same kind of thing occurred.

I let it dried for about a week. Then i started to fix some flaws like scratches, small holes and the areas where the primer had peeled of during application. For that i used the fill and finisher F2F compound from Knauff. Worked great in some areas but on others, man... it started becoming a nightmare. Basically on problematic areas, the primer either started bubelling or, even worst it went off by patches of various size. Now i tell myself, "ok don't panic"! I let them dry over night, the next day i sanded them and repatch them with the compound. But the thing is, when i patched i have to overlap a little bit on the primered area and the problem could appear on those. Those areas started to grow little by little. Sometimes i could fix them, sometimes no. On some part of the walls, it really extended like crazy (attached picture). Sometimes, the compound was ok but then when repriming the fixed areas, then the problem occurs again (because again i have to go a bit beyond the fixed zone). I tried with a second compound, same issue.

Now i did test what looked like "healthy areas" on the wall (so no apparent issue, primer looked great there): i applied either another thin coat of the same primer or by simply passing over them with a damp tissue and the problem may "randomly" appear as well. The primer starts bubbling and i can get the coating out easily using a knife or even a finger nail. When I let those zones dry out, then it becomes much more difficult to get the primer off using the way. But if redo the same test, then easy to get the primer off...

To be honest, i don't know what to think or do to make the primer holds on those fu[$*!łg walls. I don't think the primer is the culprit since i used the same primer to paint the moulding (bare plaster as well) on the ceiling (with a brush) and i could apply primer + 2 coats of paint on those without any issue.

Is there any special technique/product to make sure an already applied primer stick to the wall? How can i fix the situation? I don't even dare try to apply the first coat of paint, i guess i would end up with tons of problems...

Thanks in advance for any feedback!
 
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  #2  
Old 01-02-19, 01:47 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'm not familiar with that primer but generally when primer or paint doesn't adhere like that it's because there is a containment on the wall. What was the plaster applied to? Do you have a paint store where you could ask questions about your job with the primer you are using?
 
  #3  
Old 01-03-19, 09:48 AM
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Hello,

what sorry but is "a containment on the wall"? You mean dust or something?

Well, before buying anything, i went to a paint store to get all of my primers/paints. This brand is for professionals so i guess it is worth something. The plaster has been applied to red bricks from which i stripped the old plaster off myself. The new plaster was skimmed with compound (don't know the brand). But before they skimmed it, they also "iced" it (don't know how to call that in English). Basically the plaster looked really flat, really shinny and kind of "slippery". They put the skim coat on that. Some areas were also not properly skimmed leaving zone with this "iced" plaster.

Strange thing is that, the zones where the primer bubbles or peels of so does the skim coat (not always though)!
Today, i have been in contact with two professional painters: the one on the phone directly asked me if the plaster was iced because if it is not "decently" sanded, then paint gets a hard time to stick to it. The second one came to my house and checked it live. To him it was obvious the skimming coat was also not adhering to the plaster as it should and that probably (i guess it will be hard to find out), the guys who skimmed the plaster did not properly sand or clean beforehand.

Now the thing is the last painter did not really come with a solution to fix this other that putting another coat on top of what i have now to smooth the wall and to start from a fresh and healthy surface... something i am kind of reluctant to do since applying compound on the current creates this peeloff thing... do see on a new layer would help...

Isn't there a magic product that you apply on walls which get sucked in by the primer and makes it adhere to the wall? If it does not exist then someone should definitely invent it

I am bit desperate here :'(
 
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Old 01-03-19, 10:35 AM
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'containment on the wall' nnstupid spell check meant to write contaminant
Is it possible that moisture is coming thru the brick? Unfortunately there is no magic primer/paint that will suck thru the layers and bond everything to the wall.
 
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Old 01-03-19, 03:41 PM
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This brand is for professionals so i guess it is worth something
At least here in the US, homeowner level paint is generally better than contractor level paint.

You say the plaster was 'iced,' could that have involved something like wax? That would certainly be a surface contaminant, if so.
 
  #6  
Old 01-05-19, 11:51 AM
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Well, i am pretty sure (99,9 % ) that there is no moisture or whatsoever. The walls don't have any pipe running through and as i said and stripped down the plaster myself so i would have seen something.

For the wax well i don't know. I think what i called "iced" is what you call polished. When i check photos on google and i see venetian plaster for example, it kind of looks the same but less "extreme" i would say. But i don't know if they use wax or not. I have an appointment with my entrepreneur on Monday and i will ask him the details on the why and how his workers did that. The thing is that i have two other rooms that were plastered like that so i want to understand.

I will keep you posted.

Have a nice weekend guys.
 
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