Hardener for paint?

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-19-19, 09:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Hardener for paint?

I already have weeks invested in these cabinets and am back to square one. I started with cabinets that had mica on them. Years ago I had taken the mica off of the top cabinets and painted them with an enamel paint, leaving the mica on the bottom cabinets..,

To prep the job I peeled off the mica and sanded ALL cabinets down to get glue and paint off. I did not go down to the wood on the painted cabinets but did sand enough to remove any oils and such and to rough up the surface. I wiped all dust off, let sit and then sanded again. I then painted and let dry 24 hours before applying second coat of paint. I used Sherwin Williams water based paint that was recommended by them for this particular job. After several days of drying time I discovered that I could take a wet cloth and wipe the paint off. I am using a matte paint for the base cabinets.

After discovering this I wiped all of the paint off, sanded again and primed with Bulls Eye 123. I allowed 24 hours between coats and let sit 10 days to cure. I painted my cabinets, allowing 2 days between coats. Again, after 3 days drying time I could wipe the paint off with a damp cloth.. Keep in mind that the paint could be wiped off the wood base as well as the painted areas,

I took the paint back to Sherwin Williams and they traded it for another brand, They want me to totally strip the cabinets to the wood before painting. This is not feasible as the cabinets are still standing in the kitchen and I cannot get adequate ventilation for the chemicals needed to do this. I am going to sand the best I can and then paint with the new paint. But I have wondered if I can go over the other paint and then use a hardener.

My question is....is there something that I can use to harden the paint after applying other than polyurethane? I want the base cabinets to have the matte look. As you can tell, ;I;m not trusting the new paint either,

I have ordered new doors that will be cut from mdf and will be painted in a gloss. The contractor that is cutting the doors is even at a loss as to what is happening. I do not paint during rain and the humidity in my home is low.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-19-19, 10:03 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,521
Likes Received: 47
Welcome to the forums!

Something isn't right. Are you saying neither the primer nor the paint is curing or bonding to the substrate? Which SWP coatings were you using?

I know of no hardener that you can add to latex paints.
 
  #3  
Old 01-19-19, 10:16 AM
Shadeladie's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA - USA
Posts: 4,209
Likes Received: 22
No expert here, but just wonder if you might be putting it on too thick and heavy. I could see it wiping off in that case.
Also a question as to what you're using to paint with, as in brush or roller?
 
  #4  
Old 01-19-19, 10:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 5
The primer is sticking but the paint is not sticking to the primer. However, it didnt stick to the wood or paint prior to the primer. The paint that I was using was Sherwin William sPro Waterbased Alkyd Urethane,

I am using a paint brush, I dont think it is too thick as it is not running. I am also allowing dry time between coats. The paint is dry to the touch but you can lick your finger and rub the paint off.
 
  #5  
Old 01-19-19, 01:16 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 3,849
Likes Received: 41
The paint is dry to the touch but you can lick your finger and rub the paint off
Something is not right, dried paint should not just come off with a wet finger or rag.

This is the second paint that has exhibited the same condition?

It's a stupid question, but was the paint thoroughly mixed?
 
  #6  
Old 01-19-19, 01:19 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,521
Likes Received: 47
If dried paint is coming off with a little bit or elbow grease and water I'd be getting the paint rep out there to look at it.
 
  #7  
Old 01-19-19, 02:55 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,221
Likes Received: 34
What you're describing sounds like either bad paint, as Mark suggested, or the surface was contaminated with something.

Personally, I would be applying a couple coats of oil based primer and giving a light scuff sanding between coats before painting again. I also might switch to something like Benjamin Moore Satin Impervo over the SWP paint which is giving you the trouble.
 
  #8  
Old 01-20-19, 03:34 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,919
Likes Received: 3
Presumably you mean Formica when you say "mica",

I did not go down to the wood on the painted cabinets
If you did not remove 100% of the glue and residue from the old covering it is likely what the paint is reacting to.
The primer may be somewhat sticking but primers are porous and able to allow contaminates on the surface to migrate and react with the paint.
It is the same effect as silicone residue on a surface in that paint will not stick with that either.
I doubt you will find a magic bullet to get anything to stick and would suggest either taking the surface down to clear wood or finding a compatible glue and using the same product you removed as a new surface.
 
  #9  
Old 01-20-19, 10:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 5
GregH, This is not what I wanted to hear! My father was a contractor/millwright/cabinet builder/jack of all trades that used pine plywood and covered it with formica .....40 years ago when he built this house. I would have to disassemble the entire kitchen in order to reach all of the nooks and crannies to sand it entirely, as it is an L-shape custom kitchen complete with an island, breakfast bar, built in refrigerator and adjoining pantry. That is if the wood would hold up. I had the new doors made a bit larger to hide the pitting that occured when the mica was torn off, taking bits of wood with it.

I am going to try what stickshift suggested and if that doesn't work I will probably overlay the cabinets with 1/4 luan and go from there. I am a 60 year old widow that decided to remodel her kitchen. What was I thinking!?!
 
  #10  
Old 01-21-19, 04:41 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,919
Likes Received: 3
It might be possible to do something creative to get paint to stick.

On non wear surfaces you could try to apply a thin skim coat of drywall mud to provide a barrier between the offending contaminant and new paint.
Sand lightly to not remove too much.

Perhaps one of the Zinzer Sealer-Primer products may help bonding. of the paint.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes