Prepping cedar siding - flaking old paint


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Old 08-01-19, 08:48 AM
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Prepping cedar siding - flaking old paint

Hi all! I'm looking for any advice, dos/don't, things to consider, and anything else I missed as I get my house prepped for painting.

Here's a great example of a small job turning into a big job! I knew I had some trim and fascia that needed some new paint, as well as some areas on the siding that needed re-caulk. I also knew a house repaint was in the near future but wasn't planning on it this year. We bought the house about 6 years ago, and from talking to a neighbor it was painted a couple years before that (with one of those college pro painting services...yeah).

The house (built 1991) has cedar clapboard and cedar trim. The plan was to pressure wash (clean) the entire house and attend to areas that needed new paint or caulk. But it didn't take long to realize that the paint on the siding was in far worse shape than I thought, particularly on the south facing sides of the house that get the most sun and weather. Flaking paint everywhere. Comes off easy with a 5-in-1. Luckily the paint on the other sides of the house is in much better shape.

So now I'm looking at a complete repaint this year. I'm just finishing up pressure washing and that is removing most of the bad paint. I'm using a 1700 psi pressure washer with a rotary tip and it seems to be working well without damaging the siding...anything more powerful and feel like it would eat up the cedar too much. Here's my plan for prepping:

1. Finish pressure washing
2. Do a once-over scrap to get anything the pressure washer couldn't or missed. As well as clean out any bad caulk.
3. Sand siding to clean up any rough areas left from pressure washing and blend any old paint that is still adhering well. Random orbital sander or...?
4. Clean bare cedar? I haven't looked into this yet but wasn't sure if some cleaner/bleach solution would be good to do as a prep for primer.
5. Re-caulk, fill any holes with wood filler, tend to any loose siding, and replace any siding as needed.

So far the siding is in pretty good shape, just a couple pieces that really need replacing. Same with trim. My brother-in-law is a painter and will pay him to do primer/paint...I just want to get all the prep done. I'll consult with him, but I would be interested in any advice on primer/paint as well!

Any advice on prep, steps I'm missing, or tools I should have to make this job go smoother, I'm all ears! Thanks!

The pictures below are just after pressure washing:







 
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Old 08-01-19, 09:28 AM
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If the pressure washing roughs up the wood enough to need sanding - you used too much pressure. It's easy to do and sometimes you have to weigh the pros and cons.

Generally there is no need to use a wood brightener to prep the wood for paint. A case might could be made for it if the wood had went unpainted for a long time and had turned grey.

Oil primer is normally best as it seals the wood better than latex primer does. A quality latex house paint is best for the top coat.
 
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Old 08-03-19, 08:02 AM
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Thanks for the reply.

For the most part all the siding will be fine without any sanding. There are pieces here and there that come out a little more rough than others but likely won't be noticable once painted. Some pieces were stringy which I avoided pressure washing altogether to avoid blowing them apart.

At this point all the wood has been pressure washed and/or scraped so I'm with you on the wood brightener. Probably not necessary.

I was talking to a neighbor that went through the same thing with his house a couple years ago. He said he used SW Peel Bonding primer after pressure washing/scraping and it worked great. My brother-in-law mentioned it also. So I might consider that.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 08-03-19, 09:54 AM
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I don't think I've ever used their peel bonding primer. Their A-100 oil base exterior primer is normally my first choice for bare wood on the exterior.
 
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Old 08-05-19, 08:12 AM
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Having never used their peel bonding primer, I'm unsure how much I can get away with when prepping the siding. Feels like I'm spending a lot of time scraping beyond just getting the obvious loose paint (i.e. really getting aggressive with the 5-in-1 to lift any old paint I can). So maybe could get away with using a regular primer since I'm prepping it better than I need to. But the peel bond might be good insurance with the old wood since I've heard it fills well and essentially glues everything together. Still deciding...still have more prep to do.

What's the consensus of an oil base primer over old latex paint? I can see using it on just the bare wood, but I have a mixture of bare wood and old paint, and I see mixed opinions about putting oil over latex (oil primer over latex seems to be okay, but oil paint over latex is a no go).

Thanks!
 
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Old 08-05-19, 08:21 AM
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It depends on how much latex there is and what shape it's in. Where you have cracked/missing latex a coat of oil primer should help to 'glue' it back down. There is nothing to be gained by using oil primer over sound latex paint.
 
 

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