Anyone tried "pouring" paint over (motorcycle) components as opposed to spraying

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Old 08-14-19, 08:38 PM
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Anyone tried "pouring" paint over (motorcycle) components as opposed to spraying

So I'm taking a serious look at a bike for sale but I'll need to change the color.
On a bike this amounts to the gas tank and fenders.
Typically I use the sprayer with decent but not showroom results.
I've been thinking about getting inexpensive auto paint and just pouring it over the components and let it evenly distribute itself.
The only Issue would be droplets forming as the paint dries at the very bottom of whatever's being painted.

Has anyone done this and can provide insight...
 
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Old 08-14-19, 09:53 PM
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I'd rattle can it w/2K before I'd just pour paint over it. Aside from what you mention you'd also have inconsistent thickness, your drying would be uneven. I'd venture to guess the paint would fail a lot sooner than you might think just based upon what I've seen thick paint do in the past.

That being said, no I've never done this so YMMV.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 03:37 AM
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There has been a time or two that I've dipped small parts in paint although I think I also used a brush to remove the excess. I agree that pouring paint onto a part wouldn't end up with nice results. Spraying does produce the nicest finish. Multiple wet coats is the key.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 04:39 AM
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I've done it and gotten uneven paint thickness. It's thin at the top and thick at the bottom. Even the automakers will only dip for the base corrosion protection layers. For the pretty color they still spray.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 05:28 AM
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I second rattle can painting.
Most of the key guys in the local vintage motorcycle group do their own painting, a lot with rattle can. With the new 2k paints out, you can get showroom finish, sometimes better than a local paint shop (and 10x better than the OEM paint work on modern cars today).
 
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Old 08-15-19, 06:07 AM
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sometimes better than a local paint shop (and 10x better than the OEM paint work on modern cars today
Well I would disagree with this statement.

Being an ex body shop owner painting is both an art and science.

Paint is only as good as the prep work, cut corners anywhere, and your going to eventually pay the price.

Regarding rattle can, yes it can be there are limits, larger parts, especially body panes, the cans just dont have the coverage.

For under hood and chassis you can get away with Krylon, but anything exposed to sun (exterior) at least step up to an automotive paint or the UV will destroy it!
 
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Old 08-15-19, 06:17 AM
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My son hit a deer with his black crown vic several yrs ago which necessitated replace the grill housing. He bought a rattle can of rustoleum black. I didn't have much confidence in it holding up but the entire car was starting to fade. I was surprised that after a couple yrs that rattle can black was still shiny while the rest of the car was completely faded.

I have more confidence in using a spray gun and the coating that would be shot thru it. I would not want to spray any large panels with a rattle can! But I did meet a guy 30 yrs ago that had a T bucket kit car that he painted with aerosol cans [20-30 cans] It looked so go I questioned him on it ..... but then there isn't a lot of open panel space on a T-bucket.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 10:24 AM
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would probably just use a small air spray gun and primer, paint and clear coat to make it look as good as possible since these are small parts really no reason it should not look good if you take your time and do the prep work you could even do some air brushing and get more creative with it if you wanted some other effects than just 1 basic color.
 
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