Respirator needed for small project

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  #1  
Old 09-18-19, 05:03 PM
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Respirator needed for small project

I will be spray painting latex inside a booth set up inside of my garage and am considering if I need some kind of respirator I am guessing it depends to a degree how long I will be spraying and I can only guess, but I doubt if all spraying time will last for two hours and anticipate that no one session will be longer than 15 minutes. Afterwards, I may never spray again. I will not be shooting anything that is oil based.

So my question is do I need a respirator with filters or just a couple of the paper respirators. Or are the paper ones good for little more than sanding or will they do as long as they are rated N95 or better (since oil is not being sprayed)? I guess the answer depends on if I need protection from particulates only or if the spray includes vapors.
 

Last edited by klawman213; 09-18-19 at 05:21 PM.
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Old 09-19-19, 03:23 AM
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The paper masks are pretty much for dust, and latex does not have heavy VOC's like solvent based paints.

You can purchase many inexpensive resporatores for around $20 similar to this that would be more than adequate for that task.


https://industrialsafety.com/3m-6291...saAmBxEALw_wcB
 
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Old 09-19-19, 04:28 AM
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When spraying latex I only wear a paper mask to help keep overspray off my face. If you were spraying a solvent (VOC) based paint I would use a cartridge style respirator but it's overkill for most water based paint unless the smell of latex paint bothers you. Then I'd use a good quality charcoal paper style mask or a cartridge respirator that has charcoal in the cartridges (maybe an organic vapor cartridge).
 
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Old 09-19-19, 04:50 AM
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While I use a cartridge type respirator for almost all the spraying I do, a simple/cheap dust mask is adequate for no more than you are doing.

When doing a lot of spraying I wear a head sock which along with a respirator keeps most of the overspray off of my face, beard and neck - https://www.lowes.com/pd/Trimaco-L-X...e-Hood/3150983
 
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Old 09-19-19, 05:51 AM
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For that amount of spraying, an n95 mask would be fine.
 
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Old 09-19-19, 11:13 AM
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Thanks all. I will at least get a couple of paper n95 masks, if not the respirator flagged by Marq1. I may spring for the respirator as I may need it down the road and I only have one set of lungs and when we move I don't know if there will be a lot more painting to do.
 
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Old 09-19-19, 12:06 PM
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The N95 is a good balance between good protection and ease of breathing. I've tried N100 and found them to be too restrictive when you don't really need that level of protection.
 
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Old 09-30-19, 04:02 PM
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Marksr's head mask suggestion was a good one. Instead of scrubbing paint out of my hair I just had to scrub a small area of my face. The part still not covered by the n95. As for the amount of paint in the air, my wife watched from a safe distance and I am glad I wasn't breathing unfiltered air.

It was a lot of work clearing room in my garage to turn it into a paint booth, but now that it is set up I am going to run several projects through it. [Paint a new slider, a set of french doors, the entry doors, doors of a large linen pantry, and another 150 feet of baseboard for the upstairs.] Still, I see the justification for leaving installed doors on their hinges.

Speaking of extra work, now that all the tall baseboards are done and painted in a satin acrylic latex, my wife wants the doors semi-gloss. They will match pretty well and at least good enough. No way am I repainting the just hung baseboards.

Thanks for all the help.
 

Last edited by klawman213; 09-30-19 at 04:20 PM.
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