Is this too much for a DYI? Painting a room with problems

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Old 06-14-20, 04:14 AM
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Is this too much for a DYI? Painting a room with problems

Hello,
I'm am back at my old condo and trying to get some repairs done, I'm trying to get this room painted but first patched and hope remove the popcorn ceiling. Some of the paint has some bubbling and there is another wall that has dollar coin size bubbles, to make matters worst the old popcorn is starting to fall. I think I have to get it tested before removing it. But all in all, I'm not sure how to repair the bubbling, is this too much of a task for a DYI or should I hire someone that knows what they are doing?
Pictures are below.
Your advice and guidance is much appreciated.

https://imgur.com/a/GxO0Qejhttps://img





ur.com/a/GxO0Qej
 
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Old 06-14-20, 04:25 AM
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You are asking questions that can only be answered by you. What is your level of expertise? All the work is something I would handle. Do you know how to use dry wall compound? A large putty knife? Can you work on ladders? All things to think about. Do you have a week to spend in room?
 
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Old 06-14-20, 04:43 AM
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Hello, thank you for the reply, I'm going to be home for several months and my idea is to work on it during the weekends, I can learn how to use the tools overall and I've got a couple(pole Sander, good brushes, etc) prior I had painted my rooms but to be honest it was just a regular guy throwing some paint over, I recently sat for about an hour watching a professional painter break down the process of sanding, talking about flashing etc and made me aware that I had been doing it wrong for many years. So I have the weekends as for time, I think im handy with tools, I'm just concerned about how to repair this bubbling. I don't want to bite more than I can chew.
 
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Old 06-14-20, 05:01 AM
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How old is your condo? Asbestos was banned from residential use around 1980 although existing stock was allowed to be used up. It is unlikely any popcorn applied after 1982 would be asbestos. Asbestos is only hazardous in dry breathable form. It usually comes off best when wet/damp.

Drywall repairs are fairly easy although the dust can get messy. Novices generally need to do more sanding than pros. We should be able to walk you thru it if/when you run into issues.
 
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Old 06-14-20, 05:03 AM
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I'd like to comment on the popcorn ceiling. I've remove it on several occasions.
First get plastic sheathing and drape it all around the room from ceiling to floor. That will cut your clean up time in half. Those pole scrapper are useless as far as I'm concerned. You need to use a step ladder and get up close. I highly recommend a scrapper such as this.
From your picture it looks like it should come off pretty easy. But keep a spray bottle of water handy. In some cases short strokes will be needed while in other areas a long steady push on the scrapper will remove a lot. Don't worry too much about nicks and gouges. They can easily be patched. Along the molding, just use a tile knife to scrap the edge clean. No need to remove the molding. When you're done a coat of Kilz primer would not be a bad idea. Then paint you typical ceiling paint.
 
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Old 06-14-20, 06:49 AM
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Thank you for all the advice, the building was built in 1958, not sure when the popcorn was out in as I bought it in 2004 and it was like that. Should I get it tested? I think I saw that homedepot had a asbestos kit for $10
 
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Old 06-14-20, 07:06 AM
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Tile / floor scrapers will most often make a horrible gouged mess out of the drywall because they are TOO sharp. You have to be very careful with them. Spraying popcorn with water and a garden sprayer then pushing an ordinary 6-12" drywall knife across it will usually shave it off easily... unless it's been painted, or was mixed with paint when it was originally applied.

The crackled areas look like bad news. If that is veneer plaster, you will be doing a lot of scraping because anything cracked should be chipped off. Not impossible, but it's a real headache until you find a stopping point. (Where the veneer plaster is no longer loose and still bonded tightly to the base coat.) Those areas usually denote a water leak or moisture problem... or poor preparation back when it was repaired last.
 
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Old 06-14-20, 09:59 AM
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How you repair veneer plaster?
 
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Old 06-14-20, 10:09 AM
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You can either use more plaster or joint compound. Typically I will try to determine why the plaster failed in the first place. After you scrape it might need primer if it's an adhesion problem. Then I will typically use Durabond for the first coat and then skim with joint compound after that. But it looks like you have quite a bit of texture on those walls. Joint compound will be smooth once you sand it, and that will stand out as different. So you might need to spray on some orange peel once you are done, just to match the existing texture.
 
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Old 07-26-20, 05:17 PM
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hello all, so I scraped the wall where the air bubble was and this is what I found, I assume I have to scrape all the loose stuff until I reach the parts that are good. Do I apply the sheetrock 45 and then sand?
 
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Old 07-26-20, 05:37 PM
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Yes. It may look like this by the time you get done scraping. It was pretty much a similar scenario, but worse. Much worse.

After I got everything loose off, I primed the wall with Gardz before applying any joint compound. Then once you finish sanding the joint compound (takes about 3 coats) you prime the wall again with your favorite wall primer and give it a light scuff sanding before you paint.

Your wall has so much texture to it that you will likely want to mix in some Perlite into your primer and paint. Actually I can't tell if that's a sand texture or just lots of paint (roller) stipple. If it's just paint stipple you dont need the Perlite... that's for sand texture.
 
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Old 07-26-20, 06:04 PM
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Thanks for the advice, how much does Gardz cover? I saw that they sell it by the quart.
 
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Old 07-26-20, 06:09 PM
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A quart would do a 10x10 ft area.
 
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Old 07-27-20, 02:58 PM
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Does this look like a textured wall? I had to google it but is this like orange peel?



 
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Old 07-28-20, 03:07 AM
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That looks like an orange peel texture. You'd apply it after the repairs are made. You can buy it in an aerosol can or you can either thin down joint compound or mix up powdered texture and shoot it thru a hopper gun. On small repairs I often just pat it on with a sponge. While the texture is water soluble you still want to cover stuff up so you don't have to do a lot of clean up.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 10:22 AM
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So as I was scraping the paint and plaster that was bubbled I came across this hole next to the window sill, should I be concerned? How can I fix this?



also, this is a closer if of the wall is this textured?


 
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Old 08-01-20, 11:01 AM
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That hole below the window looks like a good indication you are getting water in that wall.
More than likely from a window leak.

 
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Old 08-01-20, 01:01 PM
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Ya, it's most likely water damage. You want to make sure that is rectified before making any plaster repairs! I've taken a appropriate sized piece of drywall and set in into holes like that using durabond as the adhesive. IMO Durabond is great for repairing plaster. It dries harder than regular joint compound similar to plaster [which I have no actual experience with]

I've never done this but I think what I would do since it's an exterior wall is to use spray foam to fill the void behind the hole and then go back and fill the hole level with the wall using durabond.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 07:12 PM
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My condo used to have the old original windows, last year I changed to hurricane impact windows so I hope the leak was from before.
 
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Old 08-03-20, 09:29 AM
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So I understand, this is the actual wall? Seems as I look in the hole I see a lose piece of concrete and the structural wall. Do I still add foam and durabond or do I fill the whole with anything else like concrete?

 
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Old 08-03-20, 10:28 AM
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On a plaster wall you have studs with lath over it. You have rock lath which is basically 2' wide drywall strips. The base coat of plaster is applied over the lath. Also called the brown coat. That is what looks like concrete. Then plaster is applied over the base coat. I propose that you fill the void with spray foam. That will give the durabond something to adhere to instead of just falling into the wall cavity. Once it's finished with durabond you'd sand and prime. A fine coat of orange peel texture will help the repair blend with the rest of the wall.
 
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Old 08-03-20, 10:39 AM
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Thank you for the prompt response, If encounter more of these do I use spray foam and same process as you suggested?
is it really orange peel textured?



 
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Old 08-03-20, 01:22 PM
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I'm not sure if it's orange peel or roller stipple but either way you need a light texture so the repair doesn't stand out.
 
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