Getting rid of sanding dust before priming?


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Old 12-12-20, 08:06 AM
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Getting rid of sanding dust before priming?

Doing what I hope will be the last sanding of drywall mud. Do people typically remove the dust before priming and painting? If so, how?

When I use a bench brush, I notice that small clumps of dust will be left here and there, which I'm sure is worse for a paint job than non-clumped dust widely distributed on the walls.

Maybe compressor and blow gun? That will certainly blow the dust off, but with all the dust circulating in the air, some of it will land back on the walls, though it wouldn't be clumped, so I suppose that's not bad.

Shop vac? Seems like a lot of work.
 

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12-12-20, 05:59 PM
stickshift
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To answer your initial question, yes, you at least need to make an effort to remove the dust as painting dust serves little purpose.
 
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Old 12-12-20, 08:56 AM
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You just do the best you can. A soft broom is typically what I use. If I did it a lot I would probably get a dust mop. The dust is so fine that anything you miss just gets absorbed into the paint. The wall may not appear completely dust free, that's normal.

You always very lightly sand a wall between coats, so after you prime you will lightly sand again. This is not an aggressive sanding, just enough to knock off anything that would otherwise feel rough to your hand. A 10x10 section of wall would take maybe 10-15 seconds to sand with a pole sander. That's how quick.
 
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Old 12-12-20, 11:45 AM
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The guys I knew who did new construction drywall always used a damp sponge.
 
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Old 12-12-20, 11:58 AM
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On new construction I always used a push broom [minus the handle] for most of the wall and a dust brush [old paint brush] in the corners.
 
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Old 12-12-20, 03:38 PM
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I use the wife's swiffer mop.
 
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Old 12-12-20, 04:00 PM
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Swiffers can be a bad choice as they contain silicone.
 
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Old 12-12-20, 05:59 PM
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To answer your initial question, yes, you at least need to make an effort to remove the dust as painting dust serves little purpose.
 
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Old 12-13-20, 02:14 AM
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A small amount of dust can be absorbed by the paint and not cause any noticeable issues but more than a little bit of dust can cause adhesion issues and sometimes cause roughness in the paint.
 
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Old 12-13-20, 05:48 AM
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Use a tack cloth if it's just a light amount. Their cheap and effective.
 
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Old 12-15-20, 01:07 PM
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I use a damp rag, or a sponge.
 
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Old 12-15-20, 02:52 PM
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I have found that a damp rag will sometimes leave stuff behind and if too damp you need to wait for it to dry.
 
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Old 12-15-20, 03:44 PM
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"if too damp you need to wait for it to dry."
Of course. I always wait for it to dry completely. Never an issue.

I use rags that don't leave bits behind. Always clean.
 
 

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