Fuzzy (oversanded) new drywall paper

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  #1  
Old 01-13-21, 11:47 AM
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Fuzzy (oversanded) new drywall paper

Installed new drywall, and at the edges of where I applied mud (the joints and screw dimples), I oversanded so the non-mudded areas adjacent to the mudded areas have drywall paper that is a little fuzzy. If I prime and paint (2 coats of color), is the difference between the smooth mudded areas and the adjacent fuzzy drywall paper going to be very obvious? Even to people who aren't looking closely at the paint?

If so, what's the easiest way to fix the fuzzy drywall paper? Can I spray Kilz Original on it to seal, then skim with mud? Or mud directly?
 
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Old 01-13-21, 11:54 AM
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You generally give the wall a light sanding with a pole sander after you prime. Some primers are better at hiding stuff like that. I'd recommend SW wall & wood primer. More expensive but worth it.
 
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Old 01-13-21, 12:01 PM
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I had someone go crazy with a power sander and fuzzed a lot of paper. You can either skim coat with mud and properly (lightly) sand. Or, prime the area and sand after the paint had cured like XSleeper said. It works better if you wait to let the primer get hard so it sands to dust instead of gumming up your pad.
 
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Old 01-13-21, 06:28 PM
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Thanks. If I can get away with skipping any more mudding and going straight to priming with a good quality primer followed by light sanding (which I'd have to do after priming even if I didn't have this fuzzy drywall paper issue), that's an easy call for me!
 
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Old 01-14-21, 03:48 AM
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As suggested above sanding those areas after priming usually fixes it. Occasionally you'd need to add a little mud over those areas to get it right - but I'd prime first, then inspect.
 
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