hiding drywall patching teach me please


  #1  
Old 05-06-21, 08:04 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 88
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
hiding drywall patching teach me please

my biggest annoyance ever! tape spackle and sanding

my problem is every time I tape ANYTHING with ANY tape I cannot for the life of me make it look good. I try to get it flush with the original sheetrock and end up sanding into the tape and adding more spackle and sanding it back off and repeat

if i sand less then you can clearly see the patch after primer and paint. forget corners impossible

drives me crazy cause ive read and watched tons of diy and it seems you just feathering it out just doesnt make sense to me. in my head i would have to lay spackle 2 feet past a 4" patch to look good after paint.

ADVISE PLEASE lol
 
  #2  
Old 05-06-21, 09:07 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 27,331
Received 988 Votes on 899 Posts
i would have to lay spackle 2 feet past a 4" patch to look good after paint.
you aren't far off. To get a patch to disappear you need to feather it. But it all goes back to how flat the tape and repair is. Thats why I like to use Fibafuse tape... it's so thin it practically melts into the wall. So you just need to cover it with a very thin coat and it makes less of a bump on the wall. So you don't have to feather it as far.

Generally I like to tape with setting compound, either Durabond or Lightweight "easy sand" Setting compound. Its a powder that comes in a bag, and you just mix it with water to make the amount you need, as you mix it in a mud pan. It's harder than joint compound, harder to sand, and less likely to crack. So, if you use it on the first coat and apply a thin layer to cover your tape, its less likely that you will ever "sand into" your tape.

2 things could lead to you creating a hump. #1, Leaving too much mud under your paper tape... this could be because you didn't thin your mud properly before you tape... or #2, it could be that you didn't wipe the tape down tight enough... or both. Both of those things go together. Thick mud = too much mud under the tape = hard to wipe down tight.

The first coat you apply after your tape is dry should apply just enough mud that you can't see the tape anymore. If you can see the tape you are putting the mud on too thin. But you also don't want to apply the mud too thick, as that's what makes the hump... and causes you to feather it out a long way to hide the hump.

So for a 4" repair, you might wipe the tape down tight with a 6" knife. But on your first coat, your intent is to cover the tape with one nice even smooth coat. So you might use a 10" knife... and try to make a nice smooth pass over the 4" repair to hide it. Then you kill all 4 edges with your 10" knife... bending the blade as you pass by all 4 sides so that you taper the edges of that 10" square you just laid on. After you do that, let's say it might be an 8" square.

After the first coat is dry... and you can't see the tape anymore, then you feather it some more... simply make a circle around your repair with a wide knife. It hopefully won't be 24" wide, but it might be 12" or 16" by the time you make a circle around that 8" patch.

Apply thin, smooth coats each time that don't need a lot of sanding. Pros sand once... when they are done. This is imperative... and something that you get better at with experience. Whatever you do, don't be sloppy or apply thick coats of mud, thinking you will sand them smooth. Your goal should be to apply the thinnest coat of mud that you can each time. Many thin coats that don't need a lot of sanding are far better than a few thick coats and a lot of sanding.

And when you do sand, go easy on it, and use a pole sander, which will help you achieve a flatter repair.

If you've watched tons of videos and they haven't helped, I doubt anything I've said here will make a difference. But hopefully something there will help you.
 
marksr voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 05-07-21, 12:32 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 7,504
Received 531 Votes on 491 Posts
I have never found that the different types of muds made a big differance in a repair with the exception of those tiny tubs of "spackling compound" they are not good for much other than filling nail holes.

Adhesive fiberglass tape is the greatest invention since sliced bread, it removes the most tedious step in a repair.

The secret, is multiple light smooth coats with every application going in a larger and larger area with a final light sanding.

The biggest mistake people make is trying to make a repair in a too small area. A quarter size repair is not an inch in diameter, its at least 8" in dia!

And don't forget the primer, several coats, feathered out past the repair. The primer seals the compound so the paint doesn't soak in and it adds texture so that nice smooth repair doesn't stand out like a sour thumb next to the old textured wall!
 
  #4  
Old 05-07-21, 02:00 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,238
Received 424 Votes on 379 Posts
The self adhesive mesh tape should have a setting compound over it to lock it down - too many failures when it's just used with ready mix joint compound. I am also a big fan of FibaFuse!

If there is any texture on the wall including roller stipple it needs to be replicated to make the repair blend.
 
  #5  
Old 05-07-21, 07:44 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 7,504
Received 531 Votes on 491 Posts
The self adhesive mesh tape should have a setting compound over it to lock it down
Not disagreeing but over the course of 30 some years, basements, repairs, additions, I have never used anything called a "setting compound" and never had any issues! Once it sets up nothing is coming out of the compound!
 
  #6  
Old 05-07-21, 01:21 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,238
Received 424 Votes on 379 Posts
IMO you've been lucky. I couldn't count the miles of sticky tape I've seen crack or blister because a setting compound wasn't used to lock it down.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: