strip paint fire hydrant?


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Old 05-15-21, 02:27 PM
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strip paint fire hydrant?

Got this fire hydrant on our property that I'd like to strip all the old layers of paint off down as much as possible to the bare iron, then recoat / renew with a new paint job. I've tried a little by applying some of that rather heavy-duty type of paint stripper available at the hardware store, but it doesn't seem to be doing the job. I've tried a couple of applications already but not working very good. Softens it a little I guess but still very tough going to try to scrape off. Any advice/comments appreciated. I was wondering if perhaps heating the surface with a propane torch would do anything to help the paint loosen for scraping/picking off?

 
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Old 05-15-21, 03:00 PM
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Are you sure you are allowed to paint the hydrant? Typically this would be the cities job and they might have rules on what type of paint, color, etc.

I would go after it wire a wire wheel on an angle grinder.
 
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Old 05-15-21, 03:06 PM
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Yes, allowed to paint it. It is on our private property and the city has no objection. I'd be painting it standard yellow color with appropriate paint type. And yes a wire wheel on angle grinder sounds like the way to go; I have both already but did not even think of this. thanks!

 
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Old 05-15-21, 08:22 PM
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When I stripped my hydrant I used this

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Citristr...G801/307416109

Which removed 80% of the paint, then attacked it with the wire grinder. Took awhile but I got about 95% off. Decided that was enough.

OT: How deeply buried is that hydrant, i.e How much room is there between the ground and the bottom of the 4 1/2" outlet?


 
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Old 05-15-21, 09:28 PM
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Nice looking outcome on that red-painted hydrant. And will try to follow through with your method on mine. As in my photo there is not much room from the ground to that 4 1/2" connection. Probably should dig down to make more room there.
 
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Old 05-15-21, 09:51 PM
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I wouldn't worry about stripping, just wire brush it till dull then paint!

Use a twisted wire brush, that will really cut into the paint!


 
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Old 05-15-21, 09:57 PM
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Ah, sounds good Marq1. THANKS
 
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Old 05-16-21, 08:17 AM
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Digging down would be a good idea. Most 4 1/2" fittings fire departments use have some sort of lug, usually 3" long to assist in tightening. Depending upon how tightly packed that rock is, it could prevent them from using the hydrant to it optimum capacity.

The twisted wire brush Marq1 pictured is the one I eventually used when I got near the original paint. The standard wire wheel barely made a dent. Not sure the primer/paint that was used on these but the original paint sticks something awful.

I used the stripper to remove the multiple overcoats applied over the years. Because there was so much excess/thick paint, a new coat would have looked uneven, chips would show. You might not have this issue.
 
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Old 06-11-21, 09:48 AM
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prep for painting hydrant

Got the hydrant extension installed, so hydrant is raised to more appropriate height. Using a combination of methods (a needle scaler tool, and strong paint remover) the hydrant is to the point where a rust preventative type primer might be applied before painting. Any recommendations/advice in that regard appreciated. POR-50? Or Ospho? Average Rustoleum primer for metal? Also recommendations for paint, am figuring I'll be brush painting not spraying, and probably an oil-base Rustoleum type paint. If that sounds fine?

 
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Old 06-11-21, 10:48 AM
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If you could get your hands on a pressure pot sand blaster and about 80# of fine sand that thing would be spotless in about an hour!

If it's clean I have always had good luck with Rust Oleum rusty red primer and paint!
 
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Old 06-11-21, 01:39 PM
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IMO Ospho is over kill. Ideally you'd get it down to clean metal but Rustoleum's Rusty Metal primer is formulated for steel/iron in that condition.
 
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Old 06-12-21, 07:43 AM
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Whew! That baby was buried. Excellent progress, I know those things are a bear to prep. Good idea on the needle scaler. Make sure you post the final result.
 
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Old Yesterday, 08:18 AM
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Make sure you post the final result.
Will do. Am in the process of now of deciding which color(s) to go with.
 
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Old Yesterday, 08:31 AM
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I have always had good luck with Rust Oleum rusty red primer
From the spray can, or do the brush on type?
 
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Old Yesterday, 02:57 PM
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Both, for my car restorations any metal brackets that are fabricated get spray primer and paint. My shed requred angle iron to support the stone ledge, that got brush on!

If a smoother surface finish is needed spray is good, brush on is poor!
 
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Old Yesterday, 03:44 PM
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It will brush ok if you thin it a little and use a decent natural bristle brush. Paint in rattle cans is drastically reduced in order to make it atomize. That makes it difficult to get the mil thickness need for good protection.
 
 

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