Opaque deck stain failure, looking for options


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Old 06-11-24, 06:34 PM
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Opaque deck stain failure, looking for options

Our deck railing is womanized lumber, about 10 years old. We painted it with a pigmented gray deck stain. Every year some of it peels. We’re at the point where we have no more stain and we want to do something else.

My thought is it’s not penetrating the wood, otherwise it wouldn’t peel. Any advice on a new product, a better prep, can we just clean the existing real well and remove anything loose before we recoat it, what product type, or a primer and product do you recommend?
 

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06-12-24, 06:33 AM
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Weathered wood has checks and cracks. Moisture gets into those cracks and then vapor drive affects the bond, forcing moisture out and lifting the finish. You won't get away from that problem no matter what you use.

You also can't expect the next coat of finish (whatever you use) to weather very well when it's applied over the previous finish. So proper prep would require a lot of pressure washing and sanding.

Hard to make a product recommendation when we don't know exactly what you are thinking or how well you intend to prep it. Unless you get all the old finish off youre kind of stuck with either using a solid stain or a paint and id never recommend you paint it.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 02:02 AM
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What stain did you use? was it a deck stain or just a siding stain?
 
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Old 06-12-24, 02:47 AM
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I would generally agree, since paint is more likely to peel than stain. That said, please answer Mark's questions for a better answer. Some pictures might help as well.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 04:57 AM
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Since what you have now is peeling is it paint? If so that really limits what you can do unless you sand the whole deck, a very tedious job.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 06:06 AM
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some of the cheaper solid stains will peel, thin pieces, not flakes
 
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Old 06-12-24, 06:23 AM
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This is the product that we used

Typical issue

 
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Old 06-12-24, 06:33 AM
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Weathered wood has checks and cracks. Moisture gets into those cracks and then vapor drive affects the bond, forcing moisture out and lifting the finish. You won't get away from that problem no matter what you use.

You also can't expect the next coat of finish (whatever you use) to weather very well when it's applied over the previous finish. So proper prep would require a lot of pressure washing and sanding.

Hard to make a product recommendation when we don't know exactly what you are thinking or how well you intend to prep it. Unless you get all the old finish off youre kind of stuck with either using a solid stain or a paint and id never recommend you paint it.
 
marksr, sdodder voted this post useful.
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Old 06-12-24, 07:05 AM
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Thanks for that. This has been an on going issue every year. The paint is on a railing with aluminum ballasters, it would be an impossible chore to completely strip it. Pressure washing is an option, I just pressure washed the AZEK deck surface yesterday. I avoided anything that was stained because if it was loose, it would be gone.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 10:55 AM
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It's a gray zone between paint and solid stain. Traditional stains soak into the wood. They provide color and protection but you can still see the grain, knots and any stains. When you go to a sold stain you are right on the line with paint and all its troubles. Recoating can be a major bit of preparation work.

Pressure washing isn't the holly grail. If your stain is at all adhered you likely will etch the wood trying to pressure wash the stain off. This will leave a very coarse and rough surface that you likely will want to sand anyhow.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 10:56 AM
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I don't have much experience with Behr stains but over all they don't have a great reputation.
As X said, a fresh coating is only as good as what it's applied over.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 11:47 AM
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You have it now but next time I would try a different product - I will never use any product of that brand simply because of the horror stories I have read in 20+ years on forums like this.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 03:36 PM
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For a solid color stain I swear by Sikkens Rubbol, which has now been bought by PPG and is sold as Proluxe Rubbol. I do not know if they have changed the formulation since purchasing it.
 
 

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