What does 'backroll' mean?


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Old 09-05-01, 03:12 PM
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I saw an earlier post where someone mentioned they were spraying paint and had backrolled over that. What does that mean and what is the benefit of doing it?

I'm using a Wagner sprayer to paint the exterior of my house now and thought this would be useful information. Thanks!

J
 
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Old 09-05-01, 03:24 PM
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jcopley,
Back-rolling may sometimes be needed if you spray your stain or paint and get excessive amounts that are much wetter than others. Back-rolling will simply even out he coat. A similar method is also used when rolling a stain on a deck - it may require back-brushing.
fred
 
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Old 09-05-01, 04:01 PM
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Thanks for the enlightenment, fewalt.

Is this something I should be concered with doing if I'm spraying MOST of my exterior but will need to use a roller or brush in SOME area's? Will this maintain a matching surface texture color? If so, can you tell me exactly how it is done? Do I just spray some, then roll over it quickly? Thanks again!

J
 
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Old 09-05-01, 11:52 PM
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J,
I wouldn't be too concerned about using this technique. I've sprayed a cedar sided house and a shed aad never had to touch a roller, cuz the stain was sucked up readily.
Now, if your trigger/gun arm is a little heavy at times and there is a chance of running paint, then you can simply back-roll a bit. If you've got a good paint 'touch', you may be lucky and not have to do any back-rollng at all.
It's 'just-in-case' fix.
fred

 
 

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